Thursday, November 27, 2014

Mamlode, a magazine that pays for essays by moms

Mamalode is a print magazine and a website, and it pays for feature essays. (Read a funny example by Shannon Day here).

Here’s what Mamlode has to say about themselves:

Our readers and writers are moms – with a smattering of dads, kids, grandparents, aunts, uncles and friends. They become Mamaloders because we give them something nobody else does – the truth and each other.

Mamalode began with a party for moms the night before Mother’s Day – Mother’s Day Eve®. The annual event grew from a small group of friends to a large public event with 500 moms and moms-to-be, and a long list of business sponsors.

In 2009, we published the first local print edition of Mamalode magazine, and today we have paid subscribers in all 50 states and 10 other countries.

Every parent has a story. By sharing our stories we give support to each other, permission to stumble and an opportunity to connect. If your writing style and story is accepting (no judgment), candid, heartfelt and if your story takes the topic to heart in a unique way, we want to hear from you.

"The Price I Pay for my Husband's Six Pack"
by Shannon Day.
Submissions: Only submissions that reflect our mission (to create connections) will be considered. No how-to or political stories are accepted. We don’t lean left or right, just on each other.

Essays for the website should be between 300-600 words, under 1,500 for print.

Mamalode pays for feature essays only: Unique views are tracked and recorded for 30 days after the piece goes live. Payments are based on unique views. Your piece is promoted on Mamalode's social media platforms and we expect you to promote your own pieces to drive traffic. 

We publish several categories: Essays, Because I Said So (short poem, blurb, etc.), Mouth of Babes (encourage your kids to write), Daddy-o Essays, and Lists (best, worst, least, greatest of anything you think parents should know), book reviews, videos and #dayinthelifeofmamalode (Instagram takeover for a day!)

Full submission guideline here.

See Brian Henry's schedule hereincluding writing workshops and creative writing courses in Barrie, Brampton, Bolton, Burlington, Caledon, Cambridge, Collingwood, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, London, Midland, Mississauga, Newmarket, Niagara on the Lake, Oakville, Orillia, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Stouffville, Sudbury, Toronto, Halton, Kitchener-Waterloo, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York, the GTA, Ontario and beyond. 

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

How to Build Your Story workshop, Saturday, Feb 7, in Stouffville

The Whitchurch-Stouffville Public Library presents…
How to Build Your Story

Plotting novels and Writing short stories

Saturday, February 7, 2015

10:00 a.m.– 3:30 p.m.

Council Chamber, Stouffville Town Hall, 111 Sandiford Drive, Stouffville, Ontario. (Map here.)

This workshop will show you how writers plot a novel and will give you the best tips on writing short stories. We’ll also look at where to get your stories published and how to win contests. Best yet, you’ll see how to apply the story-building techniques you’ve learned to your own writing. 


Workshop leader 
Brian Henry has been a book editor and creative writing instructor for more than 25 years. He publishes Quick Brown Fox, Canada’s most popular blog for writers, teaches creative writing at Ryerson University and has led workshops everywhere from Boston to Buffalo and from Sarnia to Charlottetown. But his proudest boast is that he has helped many of his students get their first book published and launch their careers as authors.


Fee: 40.71+ 13% hst = 46 paid in advance
or 43.36 + 13% hst = 
49 if you wait to pay at the door


To register, email brianhenry@sympatico.ca
or phone Faith Shergold at: 905-642-7323 

And please make out a cheque to the Whitchurch-Stouffville Public Library and drop it off at the library or mail it to…
Attention: "How to Build Your Story " workshop
Whitchurch-Stouffville Public Library
30 Burkholder Street
Stouffville, ON L4A 4K1

See Brian's full schedule hereincluding writing workshops and creative writing courses in Barrie, Brampton, Bolton, Burlington, Caledon, Cambridge, Collingwood, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, London, Midland, Mississauga, Newmarket, Niagara on the Lake, Oakville, Orillia, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Stouffville, Sudbury, Toronto, Halton, Kitchener-Waterloo, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York, the GTA, Ontario and beyond. 

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Literary agent Melissa Edwards of Aaron Priest agency seeks new authors: thrillers, female-driven commercial fiction, fantasy and YA.

Melissa Edwards
The Aaron M. Priest Literary Agency
708 3rd Avenue
New York, NY 10017-4201

Founded in 1974, The Aaron M. Priest Literary Agency is a boutique agency representing mainstream and literary fiction, thrillers and narrative nonfiction. Its clients include Erma Bombeck, Phil Caputo, and David Baldacci.

Melissa Edwards is the newest member of the team, and like all new agents, she needs authors. Melissa is a graduate of Washington University in St. Louis and Vanderbilt Law School. She is a member in good standing of the New York State bar. While Melissa began her career as a commercial litigation attorney, she always aspired to work in publishing. At present, Melissa handles foreign rights for Aaron Priest and is actively developing her own list.

Melissa’s taste ranges from classic Victorian literature to hard-boiled crime dramas. She is interested in reading international thrillers with likeable and arresting protagonists, lighthearted women’s fiction and YA, female-driven (possibly small-town) suspense, and completely immersive fantasy. Ultimately, Melissa is looking for a book that will keep her glued to the couch all day and night, and continue to occupy her thoughts for weeks later.

Read an interview with Melissa here.

Query Melissa at: queryedwards@aaronpriest.com
You may paste the first chapter of your manuscript into the query. No attachments. 
Full submission guidelines here.

Kelley Armstrong, a New York Times
#1 bestselling author and one of 
Brian's former students
On Saturday, Nov 29, Brian Henry will host "From the Horse’s Mouth: Strategies for Getting Published" at Ryerson University in Toronto, with literary agent Rachel Letofsky of the Cooke Agency, senior editor Anne Shone of Scholastic Books, and Marketing and Publicity Manager Stephen Myers of Penguin Books (see here).

And Brian will lead a "How to Get Published" workshop in Niagara on the Lake on Sunday, March 1, with literary agent Olga Filina (see here).

Other upcoming workshops, include: “How to Write a Bestseller" with New York Times #1 bestselling author Kelley Armstrong, Saturday, Dec 6, in London (see here),  Secrets of Writing a Page-turner, Saturday, Jan 17, in Toronto (here), "How to Write Great Dialogue," Saturday, Jan 24, in Georgetown (here), and “Revising and Editing,” Saturday, Jan 31 in Oakville (here).

Weekly courses: Whether you're looking for an introduction to creative writing or you're getting your manuscript ready to submit to an agent, your best bet is a weekly course. Starting in the new year, Brian will be offering classes for beginners through advanced writers. See details for all six courses here.

For details of “Welcome to Creative Writing” on Tuesday afternoons in Burlington see here, for “Writing Your Life & Other Personal Stories” on Tuesday mornings in Oakville see here, for “The Next Step in Creative Writing” on Wednesday evenings in Burlington here, on Thursday afternoons in Mississauga here, and on Thursday evenings in Georgetown here, and for “Intensive Creative Writing” on Wednesday afternoons in Burlington here.

For details of any course or workshop or to register, email brianhenry@sympatico.ca

See Brian’s full schedule here, including writing workshops and creative writing courses in Barrie, Brampton, Bolton, Burlington, Caledon, Cambridge, Collingwood, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, London, Midland, Mississauga, Newmarket, Niagara on the Lake, Orillia, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Stouffville, Sudbury, Toronto, Halton, Kitchener-Waterloo, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Monday, November 24, 2014

2 Amazing workshops: 1 with a literary agent, marketing guru & children’s lit editor and 1 with NYT #1 bestselling author

From the Horse’s Mouth: Strategies for Getting Published
Saturday, November 29
1 – 4 p.m.
Victoria Building, Room 106
Ryerson University, 285 Victoria Street, 
Toronto (Map here.)
From the Horse’s Mouth is a round table discussion with three members of the publishing community, moderated by writing instructor and editor Brian Henry. Following the presenters' introductory remarks, discussion will be opened up to the floor to address the concerns and questions of those aspiring writers present, both of fiction and nonfiction, interested in improving their chances of getting published.
Our panel:
Rachel Letofsky is a literary agent with the Cooke Agency, which represents literary and commercial fiction (including science fiction, fantasy and crime), narrative-driven nonfiction, including popular culture, science, history, natural history, politics, personal reference and children’s books. 
Rachel is actively growing her own of clients. She is particularly drawn to new authors. In fiction she is looking for everything from literary fiction, to voice-oriented young adult and new adult fiction. In nonfiction, Rachel is looking for narrative-driven memoirs and anything with a high level of quirkiness.

Stephen Myers is the Marketing and Publicity Manager for Hamish Hamilton, Penguin Canada’s boutique literary fiction imprint. Hamish publishes some of Canada’s best known writers, including Joseph Boyden, Zsuzsi Gartner, Bill Gaston, Damian Tarnopolsky, and Jeffrey Moore
Stephen Myers also handles promotions for hockey books and a selection of distribution clients, including W.W. Norton. Outside of title management, he oversees the department's internship program.

Anne Shone, Senior Editor at Scholastic Canada, will be the third member of our panel. She has worked in book publishing for close to twenty years, concentrating on children’s books for the last fifteen. In that time, she has edited and acquired picture books and novels for young people and a myriad of nonfiction titles, and has worked with many of Canada’s top children’s book authors and illustrators.
Fee: 110.21
To reserve a spot now, email brianhenry@sympatico.ca

How to Write a Bestseller
With book editor Brian Henry & New York Times #1 bestselling author Kelley Armstrong 
Saturday, December 6
10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
London Central Library, Stevenson & Hunt Room A, 251 Dundas Street,London (Map here. )
This workshop will give you the inside scoop on what gives a novel best-selling potential. You’ll learn how to get readers emotionally involved in your story, how to raise tension, control your pacing and keep your readers turning the pages. But you won't just hear about some of the best secrets of the trade; you'll learn how to apply them to give your own writing a sharp new edge.
Workshop leader Brian Henry has been a book editor and creative writing teacher for more than 25 years. But his proudest boast is that he’s helped many of his students get published, including guest speaker Kelley Armstrong...
Kelley Armstrong lives in Aylmer, south of London, Ontario, with her husband and three children. She used to program computers and attend Brian Henry workshops. Now she writes international bestsellers. Kelley has hit the New York Time’s bestseller list with both her supernatural thrillers for adults and her urban fantasy for teens. Kelley's principal publishers are Random House Canada, Dutton and HarperCollins in the U.S. and Doubleday in Britain. To date, she's published more than two dozen books, most recently Sea of Shadows a fantasy novel for teens, Loki’s Wolves a fantasy novel for Middle Grade readers, Visions, a contemporary gothic novel for adults, and Otherworld Nights, a collection of short supernatural stories for adults.
Bitten, A TV series based on Kelley’s first 13 novels, started broadcasting in January 2014.
Fee: 40.71+ 13% hst = 46 paid in advance by mail or Interac
or 43.36 + 13% hst = 
49 if you wait to pay at the door
To reserve a spot now, email brianhenry@sympatico.ca

Coming in the new year:
Secrets of Writing a Page-turner, Saturday, Jan 17, in Toronto. Details here.
How to write great dialogue, Saturday, Jan 24, in Georgetown. Details here.
Writing and Revising, Saturday, Jan 31, in Oakville. Details here.
Plus, six weekly courses for everyone from beginners to advanced writers. Details here.

See Brian’s full schedule here, including writing workshops and creative writing courses in Barrie, Brampton, Bolton, Burlington, Caledon, Cambridge, Collingwood, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, London, Midland, Mississauga, Newmarket, Niagara on the Lake, Orillia, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Stouffville, Sudbury, Toronto, Halton, Kitchener-Waterloo, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.


Sunday, November 23, 2014

Two reviews of Brian Henry's Welcome to Creative Writing course, by Paul Dias and Vera Ninos

Brian Henry leading a writing class with Barbara Fairhead and Beverley Cunningham (and someone in yellow obscured behind Barbara)

Brian Henry’s Welcome to Creative Writing Class, 
reviewed by Paul Dias

Every Tuesday for nine weeks, fifteen or more aspiring writers gather at the feet of Brian Henry, with the hope of becoming more proficient in writing stories. To this end, Le Chef D’Orchestre – a man with tremendous experience in the science and the art of skillfully delivering a compelling story in a captivating manner, holds court.

There is an abundance of raw talent in the group. To unleash their creativity, Brian has deliberately maintained a playful yet informative atmosphere. This has disarmed the participants and put them at ease. With their inhibitions suppressed, the participants allow themselves  to write stories from the depths of their souls. It is a thing of beauty and truly magical to behold.

Over the weeks of class, common errors and practices that ruin a good story are discussed. Various technical aspects of styles of writing and the dos and don’ts of creating a good story are also showcased. Brian’s natural aptitude for teaching and motivating his pupils quickly results in their writing skills improving dramatically. His protégés begin to regularly deliver praiseworthy pieces.       

Paul Dias
This gathering of minds and their cumulative wealth of experience soon reveals the presence of several good writers. More importantly, the classes have served to help each participant discover their own unique ability  to write a good story.

Paul Dias is a Jamaican by birth, who now calls Canada home. He dabbles in painting, and is a natural story-teller who dreams of writing his first best-seller.  After living and working in the British Virgin Islands for eighteen years, he moved to Burlington with his wife four years ago.
photo on file


Welcome to Creative Writing class, reviewed by Vera Ninos

The first time I came across Brian Henry's name I was at a writing workshop sponsored by the Hamilton Public Library.  Two women were discussing an upcoming one day workshop of his which they would be attending.  I wrote down his name and promptly tucked it in a drawer with my writing journal where it was forgotten.

Months later, still dabbling and skirting the edges of my desire, I attended another library workshop, where I was again intrigued by conversation about this Brian Henry.  Who was he and why was he so popular?

Though I googled him when I returned home and my level of intrigue spiked I still did nothing until weeks later when I sat at my computer registering my kids for fall activities. What the heck, I decided, and while I registered myself for an activity, too, one of Brian’s weekly course: Welcome to Creative Writing.

That's how I came to find myself spending two hours every Tuesday morning in a sunny room in a Burlington Church with other aspiring writers.

Each week, while humorously dispensing his vast knowledge of writing and writing culture, Brian is encouraging, inspiring and supportive.

Class begins with a harmonizing review of everyone's weekly writing challenges and accomplishments, then proceeds with three students presenting a show and share piece.  As in the primary years of school, a tangible article is shown. Unlike kindergarten, the article is accompanied by a short written piece.

In the safety of this warm and intimate setting, the writers often delve deep within their psyche to share personal stories of sorrow and victory, which are often both revealing and deeply moving.

From there, a weekly lesson or focus is introduced such as Showing and Telling what your characters are thinking, First Person Narratives and how to write a book review – or other kinds of reviews (hence this piece).

As class continues, students are given an opportunity to apply the lesson by beginning a written piece in class which they then share with a small group of other students.

Each week, a handful of writers bring in longer written pieces, and Brian critiques them and gives helpful suggestions.

It’s a lively class, and in addition, sounds from the daycare which is likewise housed in the church tend to filter in through the thin walls. But the murmur of children more often adds to the ambiance rather than detracting from the experience.

As each week rolls into the next, I find my body of writing expanding, my ability to access the writer in me easing, and my desire to share what I have written increasing.

Vera Ninos
I would highly recommend this class to anyone interested in tapping into their creative potential or anyone wondering if they have a creative potential.

Watch for my review of Brian's other courses as I continue on my writing journey and subject my work to his more in-depth critiques at both the intermediate and advanced levels.

Vera Ninos is Hamilton based mother of four.  You can read more of her writing at http://prosetoliveby.blogspot.ca/ 

Brian Henry’s next "Welcome to Creative Writing" class starts in January. See details of all classes starting in the new year here.

See Brian's full schedule hereincluding writing workshops and creative writing courses in Barrie, Brampton, Bolton, Burlington, Caledon, Cambridge, Collingwood, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, London, Midland, Mississauga, Newmarket, Niagara on the Lake, Oakville, Orillia, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Stouffville, Sudbury, Toronto, Halton, Kitchener-Waterloo, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York, the GTA, Ontario and beyond. 



Friday, November 21, 2014

Journal pays $50 for poems, $100 for prose; anthology pays $5 for speculative fiction; plus calls for submissions & contests

Redwing, an e-book anthology, is looking for speculative fiction between 1,500 and 6,000 words, particularly urban fantasy and space opera. Payment: $5 CAD per story, payable by PayPal.
Deadline: December 1, 2014.Guidelines here.

The Humber Literary Review is seeking submissions of prose, poetry, artwork, and comics for their third issue, scheduled for release in Spring 2015. Pays $60 per poem, and $100 each for essays, fiction, and reviews. Also pay our feature and comics artists. Contributors also receive two copies. Deadline: December 8, 2014. Guidelines.

Digital short fiction magazine Nonlocal Science Fiction seeks work for its debut issue (2015). Pays via profitsharing.The pub date for the first issue hasn’t been set yet, but get your work in fast! (And if you’re slow, don’t worry; they plan to come out quarterly.)

The Fiddlehead
Campus House, 11 Garland Court
UNB PO Box 4400
Fredericton NB E3B 5A3
http://www.thefiddlehead.ca/
Canada's longest living literary journal, The Fiddlehead is published four times a year at the University of New Brunswick. First published in 1945, The Fiddlehead is known as a WHO'S WHO in Can. Lit.
The Fiddlehead is open to good writing in English from all over the world, looking always for freshness and surprise. “Our editors are always happy to see new unsolicited works in fiction and poetry.”
Work is read on an ongoing basis; apart from the annual contest, there are no deadlines for submissions.
Submissions by mail only. Full submission guidelines here.
The Fiddlehead invites entries to its 24th annual poetry and short story contest. Short stories should be a maximum of 6,000 words. A poetry submission may be up to 3 poems, a maximum of 100 lines.
Entry fee: $30 for Canadians; $36 from elsewhere in the world. Entry fee includes a one-year subscription.
Winning entries will be published in the spring 2015 issue of The Fiddlehead (no. 263) 
and on the magazine’s website. The winning authors will be paid for publication in addition to their prizes!
Prizes: $2,000 Ralph Gustafson Prize for Best Poem
$250 each for Two Honourable Mentions

$2,000 for Best Story
$250 each for Two Honourable Mentions
Deadline: December 1, 2014. Full guidelines here.

The Capilano Review 
2055 Purcell Way
North Vancouver, BC  V7J 3H5
https://www.thecapilanoreview.ca/
The Capilano Review publishes venturesome experimental writing and art. Submissions by mail only; no email submissions. For poetry submissions, send up to 8 pages; for fiction, a maximum of 5,000 words. The Capilano Review buys First North American Serial Rights and limited, non-exclusive digital rights. Copyright reverts to the author upon publication. Contributors are paid $50 per published page to a maximum of $200.
Full submission guidelines here.
The Capilano Review invites entries for the 4th annual Robin Blaser Poetry Award to be judged by renowned poet, dramatist, and novelist Daphne Marlatt. Daphne Marlatt is the recipient of the international Uchimura Naoya Prize (2008), the Dorothy Livesay Award (2009), and the George Woodcock Lifetime Achievement Award (2012).
Award: 1st prize – $750 + publication in the Winter issue, TCR 3.24.
             2nd prize – $250
Fee: $35 for Canadian entries and $45 (USD) for non-Canadian.
Maximum 8 pages per entry.
Each entry includes a one-year subscription to The Capilano Review. If you already have a subscription, your subscription will be extended or you can sign up a friend.

Deadline: December 15, 2014. Full guidelines here.

See Brian Henry’s schedule hereincluding writing workshops and creative writing courses in Barrie, Brampton, Bolton, Burlington, Caledon, Cambridge, Collingwood, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, London, Midland, Mississauga, Newmarket, Niagara on the Lake, Oakville, Orillia, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Stouffville, Sudbury, Toronto, Halton, Kitchener-Waterloo, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.