Tuesday, May 21, 2019

Intensive Creative Writing course offered at 2 times this summmer: Wednesday afternoons or evenings


Intensive Creative Writing
Offered at two times:
Wednesday afternoons, 12:30 – 2:45
 July 3 – August 21, 2019
1st readings emailed June 26. Details to come.
St. Elizabeth's Anglican Church
5324 Bromley Rd, Burlington, Ontario (Map here.)
And
Wednesday evenings, 6:45 – 9:00 p.m.
 July 3 – August 21, 2019
1st readings emailed June 26.
St. Elizabeth's Anglican Church, 5324 Bromley Rd, Burlington, Ontario (Map here.)
Note: For information about the introductory creative writing class offered this summer, see here.
Intensive Creative Writing isn't for beginners; it's for people who have been writing for a while or who have done a course or two before and are working on their own projects. Over the eight weeks of classes, you’ll be asked to bring in three pieces of your writing for detailed feedback. All your pieces may be from the same work, such as a novel in progress, or they may be stand alone pieces. You bring whatever you want to work on. 

Besides critiquing pieces, the instructor will give short lectures addressing the needs of the group, and in addition to learning how to critique your own work and receiving constructive suggestions about your writing, you’ll discover that the greatest benefits come from seeing how your classmates approach and critique a piece of writing and how they write and re-write. This is a challenging course, but extremely rewarding.

Fee: $176.11 + 13% hst = $199
To reserve your spot, emailbrianhenry@sympatico.ca

Instructor Brian Henry has been a book editor and creative writing instructor for more than 25 years. He publishes Quick Brown Fox, Canada's most popular blog for writers, teaches creative writing at Ryerson University and has led workshops everywhere from Boston to Buffalo and from Sarnia to Saint John. But his proudest boast is that he’s has helped many of his students get published. 
Read a review of Brian's various courses and workshops, here (and scroll down).

See Brian’s complete current schedule hereincluding writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Cambridge, Georgetown, Georgina, Guelph, Hamilton, Jackson’s Point, Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Saint John, NB, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Monday, May 20, 2019

Blogs, Journals and Contests looking for your short prose and your poetry, including a poetry contest with a $20,000 prize

Sara
Note: Don't ever miss a post on Quick Brown Fox. Fill in your email in the Follow Brian by Email box to the right under my bio, and get each post delivered to your Inbox. ~Brian

Hi, Brian.
Love (and appreciate) your blog. I recently started a blog of my own where I review northern books – specifically, those set in or concerning the NWT or Nunavut.
I've posted just a handful of reviews so far, but if you'd care to give a shout-out, I'd be thrilled!
About the blog:
Northreads features articles and reviews of books, new and old, that are about Canada’s North, with a heavy emphasis on the Eastern Arctic and the NWT. The goal is create the ultimate reading list for people who want to know more about Canada North of 60.
About me:
A farm kid from Saskatchewan, I moved north to Iqaluit in 2004, then west to Yellowknife in 2013. I’ve been reading about the North ever since. I’ve also worked as a reporter in print, radio and (yes, it’s true) television, including a long stint with CBC North. @writer_minogue
Thx!
Sara Minogue
Yellowknife

The Eden Mills Writers’ Festival is happy to announce our 2019 Literary Contest!
Contest Categories:
·         Short Story: 2500 words maximum
·         Poetry: A poem or collection, no more than five poems
·         Creative Non-Fiction: 2500 words maximum
Open to new, aspiring and modestly published writers.
Prizes: The best entry in each category will win a $250 prize. Winning entries will be published on the EMWF website and the names of the winners will be included in the festival weekend program.
Entry Fee: $15 Canadian per entry. Cheque or money order payable to: Eden Mills Writers’ Festival
Deadline May 31, 2019. Guidelines here.
The Eden Mills Festival is also running poetry contests for teens and for children. See here.

Entropy Magazine is currently and indefinitely open for submissions of Reviews (collaborative reviews, video reviews, & non-traditional reviews are welcome), Interviews, Conversations, Discussions, Roundtables & Articles, Essays, Notes, Rants, Lists, Writings related to or following into any of the following categories: Creative Nonfiction, Lyrical Essay, Personal Essay, Literature, Experimental Writing, Small Presses, Translation, Science Fiction, Fantasy, Graphic Novels, Games (Video games, board games, computer games), Science, Digital & Interactive Literature, Travel, the Paranormal, Television, Film, Music, Food, Culture & Art.
Guidelines here. 

New literary journal Slippage Lit seeks writers
“As writers and fans of literature, we realise that every writer has a work or two that they know is of high quality, but is also a little out there (more than literary magazine content usually is) or not in the style of the time.
That’s the stuff we want you to submit to us!
At Slippage Lit we don’t want our contributors to feel restricted by form or genre. As such we don’t distinguish submissions by genre. We want your writing that slips between poetry and fiction, weaves together more than one genre. Have you written a memoir in verse? Fantastic, we want it! Have you written a science-fiction sonnet? Awesome, send it our way! Have you written a Horror Comedy that will have us in hysterics? That sounds like something we would like! Is what you’ve written like none of these examples, and like nothing else out there? Submit it to us!
Length 500 – 5,000 words.
Submission guidelines here.
Submissions currently open for the second issue of Slippage Lit

The biennial Ross and Davis Mitchell Prize seeks to recognize Canadian poets whose work wrestles with the beauty and complexity of religious faith. In 2019, the winner and runner-up will be awarded $20,000 and $5,000 respectively, by a panel of three celebrated writers: Lorna Goodison, Chelene Knight, and Scott Cairns.
There is a $25 USD entry fee to be paid upon submission. The fee includes a one-year digital subscription to Image (4 issues), as well as access to the journal's digital archives (50 issues) for one year.
Poets engaged with all faith traditions are encouraged to submit work, however this prize is not designed to erase distinctions or paper over conflict. There are meaningful differences between Muslims and Christians, Hindus and Orthodox Jews that cannot, and should not, be erased, suppressed, or ignored. Instead, this prize seeks to honor writing that explores the distinctive contours of belief and the shape it gives to modern life.
The 2019 Ross and Davis Mitchell Prize will be awarded to a poet who is hammering out new forms and new language to express the ineffable today. The prize seeks to encourage writers whose poems provide access to spiritual experience, awakenings that cast light on the world and make it known. We want to hear from poets who are grappling with transcendence and the divine, those for whom poetry is—as Christian Wiman would describe it—a form of theology.
The 2019 Ross and Davis Mitchell Prize invites writers to submit poetry suites, collections of poems unified and organized by a central theme or idea. All poetry genres are welcome, however your suite may be no fewer than 200 lines and no more than 500 lines. 
 Launched in 2016, the Ross and Davis Mitchell Prize is presented by Image journal, with support from Cardus. It’s open to all writers currently living in Canada and Canadian citizens living abroad. All shortlisted nominees will have their work considered for publication in Image.
Deadline: June 30, 2019. Guidelines here.

Quick Brown Fox always welcomes your book reviews – or any kind of review. If you want to review your favourite coffee shops or libraries, babysitters or lovers (no real names please), go for it. You can read an essay about how to write a book review here and see guidelines about submitting reviews of any kind to Quick Brown Fox here
QBF also welcomes essays about a favourite book or about your experience of reading or writing. Read a few essays on the blog to get a taste of what other writers have done (see here and scroll down), write your own, and submit it to me at brianhenry@sympatico.ca

See Brian Henry’s schedule here, including Saturday writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Alliston, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Georgetown, Georgina, Guelph, Hamilton, Jackson’s Point, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, New Tecumseth, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor,  Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Sunday, May 19, 2019

Great workshops soon: Building Your Story and How to Get Published with literary agent Meg Wheleler

The Niagara on the Lake Writers’ Circle presents…
How to Build Your Story
Plotting novels & Writing short stories
Saturday, May 25, 2019
10:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
(Open at 9:30 a.m. for registration & coffee)
Niagara on the Lake Public Library
10 Anderson Lane, NOTL, Ontario (Map here.) 
This workshop will show you how writers plot a novel and will give you the best tips on writing short stories. We’ll also look at where to get your stories published and how to win contests. Best yet, you’ll see how to apply the story-building techniques you’ve learned to your own writing.
Fee: $43.36 + 13% hst = $49  in advance or $46.90 + 13% hst = $53  at the door
To reserve a spot now, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca


Walk It Off by Ruth Marshall,
Represented by Westwood Creative Artists 
How to Get Published
An editor & a literary agent tell all
Saturday, June 8, 2019
10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Waterloo Regional Police Station, Community Room
45 Columbia St. E. Waterloo, Ontario (Map here)
If you've ever dreamed of becoming a published author, this workshop is for you. We’ll cover everything from getting started to getting an agent, from getting your short pieces published to finding a book publisher, from writing a query letter to writing what the publishers want. Bring your questions. Come and get ready to be published!
Special Option: Participants are invited to bring a draft of a query letter you might use to interest an agent or publisher in your book. You don’t need to bring anything, but if you do, three copies could be helpful.
And be sure to bring your elevator pitch! Following the end of the formal workshop at about 3:45, Brian Henry will be staying for at least half an hour and helping interested attendees, who didn’t have their queries critiqued earlier, write query letters that will get a yes, while literary agent Meg Wheeler will be listening to your pitches. Agents come to these events wanting to hear what you’ve got and hoping to find authors they want to represent.

Meg Wheeler is an Associate Agent and International Rights Director with Westwood Creative Artists, one of Canada’s largest literary agencies. It’s also one of the oldest and most respected. Clients of the agency  include Mark Sakamoto, Justin Trudeau, Yann Martel, Thomas King, Rohinto Mistry, Alan Doyle, Rosemary Sullivan, and Kyo Maclear.  There are six agents on the team: Jackie Kaiser, Michael A. Levine, Hilary McMahon, John Pearce, Bruce Westwood, and Meg Wheeler.
Meg’s inbox is open to submissions of all kinds, but she has a particular soft spot for literary fiction, women’s commercial fiction, and the gamut of nonfiction. She’s also interested in young adult and middle grade fiction.
Fee: $43.36 + 13% hst = $49 in advance or $46.90 + 13% hst = $53 if at the door
To reserve a spot now, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca
 
Workshop leader Brian Henry has been a book editor, author, and creative writing instructor for more than 25 years. He publishes Quick Brown Fox, Canada’s most popular blog for writers and is the author of a children’s version of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (Tribute Publishing Inc). But his proudest boast is that he’s has helped many of his students get published. 
Read reviews of Brian’s classes and workshops here.
Note: Don't ever miss a post on Quick Brown Fox. Fill in your email in the box to the right under my bio, and get each post delivered to your Inbox. ~ Brian

See Brian’s complete current schedule hereincluding Saturday writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Alliston, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Georgetown, Georgina, Guelph, Hamilton, Jackson’s Point, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, New Tecumseth, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Saturday, May 18, 2019

“It’s time to say goodbye to my hair dye” by Monica Catto


No. 40 failed to do the job for which she was hired, so I let her go. In the beginning, she was eager to please and attentive; she could complete her assigned task in a matter of minutes with brilliant results. But recent performance appraisals had revealed that she was becoming significantly slower with a notable lack of inspiration. 
Flaws in her workmanship would surface, mere days after assuring me that she had covered all her bases. I was convinced that she didn’t even want the job any longer. Month after month I would deliberate over whether or not to continue giving chances to improve, but I consistently drew the same conclusion: Your services are no longer required, No. 40.
I remember the first time I allowed a hair stylist to colour my hair. I just wanted to try something new, something fun. The day of my husband’s workplace Christmas party was probably not the best time to experiment. I can still remember the stares as I walked into the banquet hall. Instead of the warm and subtle auburn I’d asked for, it was a shock of flaming apricot that I got; a colour that would have made even Lucille Ball blush. If head-wraps had been a thing then, I would have sported one. Heck, even a tuque would have been an improvement.
I no longer trusted (or could afford) using a stylist to colour my hair so experimented on my own. If I screwed up, I only had myself to blame. And it became a vicious cycle of covering up one mistake to invariably create another. 
Once, a friend thought it would be cool if we took a section of our bangs and used peroxide to bleach out a funky splash of platinum. She was blond. Me, not so much. She ended up with a funky splash of platinum and I had to endure an outcrop of orange that had my children following me through the grocery store at a wary she’s-not-our-mother distance.
Over the years I’ve tamed my sense of adventure – at least where my hair colour is concerned. I matured into a sensible match-your-natural-hair-colour kinda girl. That season lasted until spring of this year. I’d grown tired of heading to the local drug store to stock up when dye was on special. Sale or not, I couldn’t justify the cost nor the effort in my attempts to keep up with the silver wires that popped up mere days after the dye being applied. Thus, No. 40 met her demise.
It was a little daunting in the beginning. I’d become that woman that I’ll admit I’d secretly judged. You know her – she’s the one sporting the grey roots along her part. She looks weary from trying to look comfortable in her own skin, yet acutely aware of the metamorphosis occurring on her own noggin.
It takes balls to go grey. Once it’s confirmed that there’ll be no dye touching your roots or any other part of your head, it’s open season. All of a sudden, you are fending off the unsolicited advice of friends – and strangers. As if someone has died, you are offered condolences. “Oh, I’m sorry. You’re not colouring your hair anymore?”
“No, I’m afraid that season has come to an end.” And then you mentally add, “I’m so sorry to learn that you’ve lost your ability to keep your mouth shut. Such a terrible loss for us all.”
I was on a date with a guy I’d foolishly given a second chance. He blurted out, “Wow. You’re really grey now. When are you going to start dying your hair again?”
“When are you going to stop?” I replied rather curtly. No third chance for you, Mr. Grecian Formula.
There’s a double standard when it comes to society’s perception of men versus women going grey. I’ve spoken to men who claim there is a struggle to embrace the salt along with the pepper and the temptation to cover it up is just as real for them as it is for women, but my own observation has been that a man’s maturing hair colour is celebrated; they are often seen as sexy, sophisticated and mature. Women go crazy for that. (George Clooney, Patrick Dempsey – need I say more?)
But grey on a woman?
“She’s old.” “Not in the game anymore.” “Given up.”
Yes, I suppose I have. I’ve given up desiring the approval of others and I’ve also given up on a self-limiting belief system that says my value and worth are found in what can only be seen on the outside. Make no mistake, I am still very much in the game and old happens in the mind before it appears on the outside.
I applaud any woman who has the determination – and money, for that matter – to continue to cover the grey. You are beautiful, but so am I. I’ve had more compliments on my hair now, than I did when I coloured it. I don’t think it’s the hair colour that has triggered the comments. It’s the confidence that has emerged with it. You have to be a courageous to spend almost a year of your life with two different hair colours battling it out on your head.
My current hairdresser reckons with one more visit of the scissors, the last vestiges of the previous colour will be gone. It’s been a long process, when I think of it. Beginning with hair that hung halfway down my back, it now barely reaches my shirt collar. The past year has been a season of identity correction; a time of letting go – not just hair and its colour, but mind-sets that no longer serve me well and burdens that are not mine to carry. What I’ll be left with will be pure silver and pure Monica.
Farewell, No. 40. Good riddance.
*** 
Note: If you liked this piece, you’ll also like “Gorgeous” by Kyle William Gonsalves here.

Monica Catto is an aspiring photographer, writer and social justice activist working in the human trafficking field with theWhite Rose Movement of Toronto. She lives in Mississauga, Ontario. You can visit her blog here. 
“It’s time to say goodbye to by hair dye” was originally published in the Globe and Mail in their “First Person” feature. For information on submitting a personal essay to the Globe and Mail (and to 21 other places), see here.
See Brian Henry’s schedule hereincluding Saturday writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Alliston, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Georgetown, Georgina, Guelph, Hamilton, Jackson’s Point, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, New Tecumseth, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Friday, May 17, 2019

Two new books by Gila Green: one for young adults and one for adults


Dear Brian,
I would like to let you know that my young adult, environmental fiction novel No Entry is now available for pre-order from StormBird Press here.
No Entry has a teen, Canadian heroine who takes on a dangerous poaching ring in South Africa's Kruger National Park and is the first in a series. I'm working on the sequel titled The DroneZone right now. The series is being written as an effort to increase awareness of the dangers of elephant extinction and the ivory trade, which is still very much in demand.
My novel in stories for adults White Zion will be out May 17. White Zion follows one family from Yemen to Mandate Palestine to Canada and modern Israel and is an effort to expand Jewish literature to include more Sephardi voices.* It explores immigration, alienation, racism, sexism all against a backdrop of war.
It’s available from Amazon here. And I’m having a giveaway on Goodreads here.
Thank you and all the best,
Gila Green
Note: Shephardi are the Jews of Spain. Following their expulsion from Spain in 1492, they settled throughout the Mediterranean – North Africa, the Middle East, the Balkans, Greece, the south of France (particularly Marseilles), and also Amsterdam  mostly places that already had Jewish communities connected to the Jews of Spain. 
The large majority of Shephardim now live in Israel, as they were expelled from Muslim countries in the second half of the 20th Century and, in Europe, were murdered along with other Jews by the Nazis. Some, though, live in Canada, such as my wife, who’s partly descended from the Sherpardic Jews of Amsterdam. ~Brian

See Brian’s schedule hereincluding Saturday writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Alliston, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Georgetown, Georgina, Guelph, Hamilton, Jackson’s Point, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, New Tecumseth, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

You're invited to s a book launch for Ready to Come About by Sue Williams, on Thursday, June 6


Hi, Brian.
I am so excited to announce the book launch for my memoir, Ready to Come About, being published by Dundurn Press.
Come and join David and me in the celebration! We will have refreshments, live music and readings (yikes!). The book will be on sale, and there will be a cash bar.
Details:
Thursday June 6, 2019
6 to 8 p.m.
The eBar at the Bookshelf
37 Quebec Street 2nd floor, Guelph
I hope to see everyone there.
Sue Williams

Here is a little blurb about the book:
It wasn’t a midlife crisis. She wasn’t running from the law. She didn’t have an adventure-seeking bone in her body. In the wake of a perfect storm of personal events, Sue suddenly became convinced that, in her sons’ best interest, she had to get out of their way. And her husband, David, needed to follow his dream to cross an ocean. So she’d go too.
Ready to Come About, Sue’s debut book, is a compelling memoir about her improbable adventure on the high seas, and her profound journey within, through which she grew to believe there is no more precious gift than the liberty to chart one’s own course, and that risk is a good thing… sometimes, at least.

Early Praise for Ready to Come About:
I love Sue’s book, a startling, swashbuckling sea adventure, and all the hilarious and terrifying details of that, combined with the very personal story of lost connections and deep love. It is a remarkable story — heroic and inspiring.
Miriam Toews, author of Women Talking

If you miss Sue’s book launch, you can buy a copy online here.
For information about submitting to Dundurn Press, see here.

See Brian Henry’s schedule here, including Saturday writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Alliston, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Georgetown, Georgina, Guelph, Hamilton, Jackson’s Point, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, New Tecumseth, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor,  Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.