Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Two great workshops in June: How to Make Yourself Write and Writing Your Life & Other True stories


How to Make Yourself Write
A Creativity Workout
Saturday, June 9, 2018
1:00 – 4:30 p.m.
London Public Library, Tonda Room, 251 Dundas St, London, Ontario (Map here)
Let's get motivated! This workshop is designed to help you find the time and the inspiration to write. No more staring at a blank screen. Come to this workshop and give yourself a kick-start, and then learn how to keep going. This creativity workout will get your words flowing and help you make the breakthrough into the next level of writing.
Fee: 37.17 + 13% hst = $42 paid in advance by mail or Interac or 39.82 + 13% hst = $45 if you wait to pay at the door
To reserve a spot now, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

Writing your life and other true stories
With guest author Ross Pennie
Saturday, June 23, 2018
10: a.m. – 4 p.m.
Unity Church, Unit 8, 30175 Ridgeway Drive, Mississauga (Map here.)
Have you ever considered writing your memoirs or family history? This workshop will introduce you to the tricks and conventions of telling true stories and will show you how to use the techniques of the novel to recount actual events. Whether you want to write for your family or for a wider public, don't miss this workshop.
Ross Pennie is the author of The Unforgiving Tides, a doctor’s memoir of Papua New Guinea (Manor House Publishing). Ross also writes medical mystery novels, published by ECW Press. The first of these, Tainted, came out in 2010 and won Arts Hamilton Literary Award for Fiction. He’s followed up with three more medical mysteries: Tampered, Up in Smoke, and Beneath the Wake(For more about Ross's mysteries or to buy one, see here). 
At the workshop, Ross will speak on how to turn ordinary life into dramatic material and will answer questions about how he wrote his memoir and got it published.
Fee: 37.17 + hst = $42 paid in advance or 39.82 + hst = $45 if you wait to pay at the door
To reserve a spot now, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

Workshop leader Brian Henry has been a book editor and creative writing instructor for more than 25 years. He publishes Quick Brown Fox, Canada’s most popular blog for writers, teaches creative writing at Ryerson University and has led workshops everywhere from Boston to Buffalo and from Sarnia to Charlottetown. But his proudest boast is that he has helped many of his students get published, including Ross Pennie, the guest speaker at the Writing Your Life workshop.

See Brian’s complete current schedule hereincluding writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Cambridge, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Saint John, NB, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.


Tuesday, May 29, 2018

32 Canadian literary journals that pay

Note: Don't ever miss a post on Quick Brown Fox. Fill in the "Follow Brian by Email" box to the right under my bio and get each post delivered to your Inbox. 
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Finally, if you’re not yet on my newsletter, send me an email, including your locale, to brianhenry@sympatico.ca ~Brian

The Antigonish Review
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, reviews
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $50 plus two copies


Arc Poetry Magazine
Accepts: Poetry
Issues per year: 3
Submission period: Fall
Payment: $50 per page, one copy of the issue

Canadian Literature
Accepts: Poetry, reviews
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Year round
Payment: Honorarium for poetry

Canthius
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry
Issues per year: 2
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $5 per page, one copy of the issue

Accepts: Poetry
Issues per year: 3
Submission period: See dates
Payment: $50 per published page to a maximum of $150

The Carousel
Accepts: Fiction, poetry
Issues per year: 2
Submission Period: January and September (
see dates)
Payment: $55 for 1-4 pages, $100 for five or more pages, a two-issue subscription which includes the copy with the submitted work

Carte Blanche
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry
Issues per year: 3
Submission period: Spring and Fall
Payment: Honorarium per submission

The Claremont Review
Accepts: Poetry, fiction, visual art
Issues per year: 2
Submission period: Fall
Payment: $10 per page


Contemporary Verse 2: The Canadian Journal of Poetry and Critical Writing (CV2)
Accepts: Poetry, nonfiction, interviews, reviews
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Sept. 1 through May 31
Payment: $30 per poem, $50-$100 for interviews and articles, $40-$150 for essays, $40-$80 for reviews, two copies of the issue

Event
Accepts: Fiction, poetry, nonfiction
Issues per year: 3
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $25 per page ($30 for poetry), up to $500


Exile
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, translation, drama, visual art
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Year round
Payment: 5¢ per word, one copy of the issue


Existere
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, reviews, visual art
Issues per year: 2
Submission period: Year round
Payment: Honorarium, one copy of the issue

The Feathertale Review
Accepts: Fiction, poetry, cartoons
Issue per year: 2
Submission period: Year round
Payment: Payment if submission is published in print

The Fiddlehead
Accepts: Fiction, poetry
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $60 per published page, two copies of the issue

filling station
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, visual art
Issues per year: 3
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $25 honorarium, complimentary 3-issue subscription, discount on future renewals and subscriptions

Freefall Magazine
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, book reviews, art
Issues per year: 3
Submission period: 
See dates
Payment: $10 per page to a maximum of $100, one copy of the issue


For weekly creative writing classes, one-day workshops, and the Algonquin writing retreat, see here.

Grain
Accepts: Fiction, literary nonfiction, poetry
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Sept. 1 to May 31
Payment: $50 per page to a maximum of $250, two copies of the issue

Hamilton Arts & Letters
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, reviews
Issues per year: 2
Submission period: Spring and fall
Payment: Honorarium

Humber Literary Review
Accepts: Fiction, personal essays, poetry, visual art
Issues per year: 2
Submission period: 
See dates
Payment: $100, two copies of the issue


The Impressment Gang
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, reviews
Issues per year: 3
Submission period: 
See dates
Payment: $25, two copies of the issue


The Malahat Review
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $60 per published page, one-year subscription

The New Quarterly
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $250 for fiction and nonfiction, $40 for poetry

On Spec
Accepts: Fiction, poetry
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: 
See dates
Payment: Yes

Plenitude
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, reviews, interviews
Issues per year: Online only
Submission Period: Year round
Payment: $60 for prose, $25 for poetry

Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Year round
Payment: 10¢ per word for prose to various maximums, $40 for poetry

Prairie Journal of Canadian Literature
Accepts: Fiction, poetry, drama, literary criticism
Issues per year: 2
Submission period: Year round
Payment: Honorarium if submission is published in print

Prism International
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $30 per printed page for prose, two copies of the issue

The Puritan
Accepts: Fiction, poetry, essays
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $100

Room
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, visual art from women. Men not welcome
Issues per year: 4
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $50 for one page, $60 for two pages, $90 for three pages, $120 for four pages, $150 for five or more pages

subTerrain
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry
Issues per year: 3
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $50 per page, $50 per poem

Understorey Magazine
Accepts: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry
Issues per year: 2-3
Submission period: Year round
Payment: $30-$60 honorarium


Vallum
Accepts: Poetry, essays, reviews
Issues per year: 2
Submission Period: Year round
Payment: Yes


See Brian Henry’s schedule here, including writing workshops and creative writing courses in Algonquin Park, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, Kitchener, London, Midland, Mississauga, Newmarket, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, St. John, NB, Sudbury, Thessalon, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Kitchener-Waterloo, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Sunday, May 27, 2018

“Travels With My Debut Novel” by Lynda Archer


While on the ferry between Vancouver and Vancouver Island, a First Nations man in his sixties, held out the postcard I had given to his granddaughter a few moments earlier. It was the postcard my publisher had created with the cover of my book, Tears in the Grass, on one side, a brief summary of the novel on the other side. I had a few seconds of panic until he asked where he could buy my book.

Rarely was it the case (I hate the business side of writing) but I actually had a copy in my car and I got it for him. This man, who later sent me a kind note on Facebook, told me that he and his wife were residential school survivors, and since the main character in my novel was an elderly residential school survivor, he wanted to read it.

I told him that I was not of First Nation heritage, but I’d done my research, talked to indigenous people and knew something of the timeless reach of trauma through my work as a clinical psychologist. He thanked me for writing my book and said what was important was that more people learn about what happened to his people.

At one of my readings a First Nations woman stood up and said when I read the section about my character, Elinor, hoarding food for her journey to find her lost daughter, she was reminded of her own time in residential school, that they never had enough to eat, that they didn’t learn how to cook, and that was why so many of her people were overweight. She bought my book and said she hoped it would help with her healing.

I have stories from others in emails, on my website and Goodreads page, for whom my book has had meaning and reflected their own lives. A young First Nations woman whose mother was a residential school survivor has become a dear friend who visits regularly. She has read my book and calls me an ‘ally’ in the reconciliation movement. I have found all of these connections, messages and communications very moving. No doubt lots of authors have these type of experiences. While quite unprepared for the array of responses I received I am deeply grateful for them all.

Because I wrote the book that I did need, when I did, I have become immersed in a momentous moment in Canadian history. Between 2010 and 2013, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission travelled the country bearing witness to and recording the stories of First Nations people who are residential school survivors. Approximately 6,000 thousand people testified, several volumes of the proceedings were published and are available on Amazon and in libraries across the country. 

My novel was released into that climate. I still have moments when I think I should not have written what I did; I’m not a First Nations person. And, to this day, the discussion in magazines, on television and in newspapers about cultural appropriation remains fierce in Canada.

I started my novel at Spalding, an earlier version was my Creative Thesis. Even then I had doubt. But wise Spalding mentors counselled that if I followed that line of reasoning I would only write my own memoir. The friend who has called me an ally tells me that the characters in my novel are believable, honest and true human beings, not the stereotypical drunken and drug addicted Indian.

In June 2017 I travelled to New York City to attend the Lambda Literary Awards. My novel was nominated in the Lesbian Fiction category. Although I didn’t win I’ve not spent a moment bemoaning that. It was a wonderful evening to chat with other authors and to hear Jeanette Winterson, Masha Gessen and Jacqueline Woodson speak. And, a real treat, while in New York, I had lunch with Neela Vaswani, my mentor in my final term at Spalding University!

Any advice? Write outside your comfort zone, write what you don’t know. Who knows where it will take you.

Lynda Archer has published short fiction and nonfiction in The Dalhousie Review, The New Quarterly, Carve Magazine and Canadian Family Physician.  Her debut novel, Tears in the Grass, was a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award. Lynda holds an MFA in Fiction and a Ph.D. in Psychology. Her work as a clinical psychologist for almost thirty years, as well as her early years growing up on the prairies, inform much of her writing. Lynda is at work on a new novel and more stories. She is a Goodreads Author and her website is: www.lyndaarcher.ca  

See Brian Henry’s schedule here, including writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Cambridge, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Saint John, NB, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Thursday, May 24, 2018

You're invited to a book launch for Out of Darkness, Light, by April Bulmer

Quern, a poetry collection
featuring April Bulmer
April Bulmer invites you to her book launch:
Saturday, May 26
2:00 – 4:00 pm
 at Idea Exchange Preston, 435 King St. East, Cambridge, Ontario
 The book is a collection of poetry called Out of Darkness, Light (Hidden Brook Press, John B. Lee Signature Series).  April will be launching with poet, Mary Ann Mulhern, from Windsor. There will be short readings and refreshments. Books will be available for sale and signing.
This is a free event. Parking, too, is free at the lot on King St. E and Dover St, or at the Alan Reuter Centre just east of the library.
Any questions, email april.poet@bell.net

See Brian Henry’s schedule here, including writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Cambridge, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Saint John, NB, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Writing Kid Lit weekly course, Oct 5 – Nov 30, in Toronto

The Rising, a YA novel by Kelley Armstrong
a New York Times #1 bestselling author
and one of Brian's students

Writing Kid Lit ~ Picture Books to Young Adult
Friday afternoons, October 5 – November 30, 2018
1:15 – 3:15 p.m.
Glenview Church, Bethlehem Room, 1 Glenview Ave, Toronto, Ontario (Map here.)

From picture books to young adult novels, this weekly course is accessible for beginners and meaty enough for advanced writers. Through lectures, in-class assignments, homework, and feedback on your writing, we’ll give you ins and outs of writing for younger readers and set you on course toward writing your own books. 

We’ll have two published children’s authors as guest speakers:

Jennifer Mook-Sang grew up in Guyana and moved to Canada when she was fourteen. While reading bedtime stories to her two sons, she fell in love with picture books and decided to write one of her own. In one of Brian Henry's classes she found the beginnings of a story. That story grew into the humorous middle-grade novel Speechless, published by Scholastic in 2015. 
Speechless won the Surrey Schools Book of the Year Award, was shortlisted for many others, and was recommended by the Ontario Library Association, the Canadian Childrens’ Book Centre, the CBC, and the TD Summer Reading Club. 
Then in October 2017, Jennifer published her first picture book Captain Monty Takes the Plunge with Kids Can Press. Captain Monty is the boldest, stinkiest pirate to sail the six or seven seas; in fact, he’s never had a bath. Naturally, the Junior Library Guild immediately selected him for its fall list of recommended books. Captain Monty has also been nominated for the Rainforest of Reading Award and Jennifer will be travelling to St. Lucia for that Festival in March.
Jennifer lives in Burlington, Ontario. You can find out more about her here. 
Speechless is available online here. And Captain Monty Takes the Plunge is available here.

Kira Vermond is an award-winning writer with over 1,500 articles to her name. She has been a frequent contributor to the Globe and Mail, Chatelaine, CBC and Today's Parent.
Kira is the author of four nonfiction books for young readers: Half-Truths and Brazen Lies, (read more about Half-Truths here); Why We Live Where We Live (more here);   Growing Up: Inside and Out, (nominated for on Ontario Library Association Forest of Reading Award) and The Secret Life of Money: A Kid's Guide to Cash (which was my son’s and daughter’s favourite book  the year it came out, although my kids are four years apart).
Kira lives in Guelph, Ontario. 

Workshop leader Brian Henry has been a book editor, author, and creative writing instructor for more than 25 years. He publishes Quick Brown Fox, Canada’s most popular blog for writers and is the author of a children’s version of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (Tribute Publishing Inc). But his proudest boast is that he’s has helped many of his students get published. 
Read reviews of Brian’s classes and workshops here.

Course fee:  $176.11 plus 13% hst = 199
To reserve your spot, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

See Brian’s complete current schedule hereincluding writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Cambridge, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Saint John, NB, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.