Thursday, July 19, 2018

Secrets of Writing a Page-turner, Saturday, Dec 8, in Guelph


Secrets of Writing a Page-turner
Techniques for making any story more compelling
Saturday, December 8, 2018
10:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Harcourt United Church, 87 Dean Avenue, Guelph, Ontario (Map here

Ever stayed up all night reading a book? In this workshop, you’ll learn you how to build that kind of tension.  And we'll help you put into practice the techniques professionals use – on every page and in every kind of story – to create drama and tension.

Workshop leader Brian Henry has been a book editor and creative writing instructor for more than 25 years. He publishes Quick Brown Fox, Canada’s most popular blog for writers, teaches creative writing at Ryerson University, and has led workshops everywhere from Boston to Buffalo and from Sarnia to Charlottetown. But his proudest boast is that he has helped many of his students get their first book published and launch their careers as authors. 
See reviews of Brian's classes and workshops here.

Fee: 43.36 + 13% hst = 49 paid in advance by mail or Interac
or 46.90 + 13% hst = 53 if you wait to pay at the door
To reserve a spot now, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

See Brian’s complete current schedule hereincluding writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Cambridge, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Saint John, NB, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

“The Hermit of Carmel” by Gregory Phipps



“Damn it, Rob! I mean Paul. You might have mentioned this before we drove six hours to come up here.”
Robert Das, who'd written his bestseller under the pseudonym Paul Thebét, was having second thoughts about this public book reading. His agent, Murray Levitt, was losing his patience. Levitt continued his rant. “What the hell am I supposed to do now? Seriously. I could have gone golfing today. And it’s sunny back in LA. I’m here to support you instead. And now…” He shook his head. “I should have brought my damn reflux pills.”
 “I value my privacy. You know that.”
“And that’s why you created the pseudonym. I get it. Nobody here knows who you really are. You’re Paul Thebét. Relax. By the way, are you supposed to be French-Canadian or like, French-French?”
Robert ignored his sarcastic question. “Just cancel it. Let’s leave. Nobody paid to come. I suspect it’s all locals anyway. We drew, what, a hundred people? I’m sure some folks will buy a book while they’re here. The owner will be happy regardless. Tell her I have food poisoning or something. You’re a good liar.”
Levitt winced. “No. We’re not. You made a commitment to do some readings. These aren’t easy to get, you know. You’re here in Carmel-by-the-Sea. You love this place! And locals are going nuts for this. You should see the Twitter chatter.”
“I don’t do social media.”
“No shit. That’s another thing. You’re expected to be active on social media to promote the book…. and build your personal brand. Work with me Robert, please. You love to write. Social media is just another form of writing. It doesn’t take a lot to write 140 fucking characters!”
“I’m a storyteller. You can’t tell a story in 140 characters.”
“Bullshit! Hemingway once wrote a short story in six words. Six words! Hemingway was a businessman … and quite content to sell books, or anything, to make a buck. Listen to me, Rob. I am a businessman. I represent writers who tell stories and understand that publishing is a business. Consumer buys book. Retailer makes money. Distributor makes money. Printer makes money. Publisher makes money. Writer gets paid. Agent gets paid. It’s simple. Think of it as one of those circle-of-life things. Like the forest and all its adorable creatures.”
“You mean the ones that kill each other?” asked Robert.
“No, the ones that live symbiotically. Like the birds who knock pine cones off trees so the squirrels can eat the seeds.”
“Birds don’t do that at all. The owls in those woods out there,” he said, motioning with his head, “kill and eat squirrels and even other birds. You mean that circle of life?”
“Great. You’re a wildlife naturalist now. Be a writer for one hour … please.  Look, I know you hate public speaking. But do this one reading and we’ll reconsider the others. Better yet, jump on that revolutionary new social media thing and you might never have to leave the comfort of your home again.” Levitt opened the stockroom door and pointed to the throng that had gathered on this rainy Saturday afternoon. “Look. There’s a bunch of successful business people, artists and even a few celebs. It’s crazy out there! ” Levitt tried to walk his comment back. “I mean… in a good way.”
“I should have returned to law,” Robert sighed.
Levitt attempted to redeem himself. “People hate lawyers. Lawyers only take. You give.”
“But writers can’t hide anymore.”
“Truth,” conceded Levitt. “But don’t do the delicate genius thing.”
“I am neither.”
Levitt motioned to the room. “He probably doesn’t do social media either, but Clint-fucking-Eastwood is out there. I’m sure it’s him. Geez, he got old. He used to be the frickin’ mayor here. He’s a living legend in Carmel. If all those people tweet about this, thousands of followers — readers — will hear about the book. This is business Robert. Please, as your agent, I’m begging you to do this. You’re a local hero.”
“I live in Los Angeles, Murray.”
“Whatever. You know what I meant.”
Levitt grabbed Robert by the shoulders and manhandled him out of the stockroom — like a football coach might a losing quarterback onto the field for the final quarter. They had been sequestered in the cramped and stale-smelling room for the last twenty minutes. He spoke into Robert’s ear, so he could be heard over the background noise, as they entered the bookstore proper.
“You crafted a great story, Robert. Write yourself a convincing one now. You’re an entertaining and confident speaker who loves his adoring fans and is equally loved by them. Play that character for just an hour.”
Robert looked grim. The bookstore owner saw them exit the stockroom, her cue to read an introduction for Thebét. The sound of restrained applause replaced the muffled sounds of a hundred private conversations. His heart raced as he shuffled onto the bookstore floor.
#

Robert appeared uncomfortable standing before the group of locals. The throng filled every square foot of floor space in the modest bookstore. The number of people likely exceeded the allowable limit defined by local fire regulations. If the storeowner cared, it didn’t show. She looked ecstatic. Thebét was a local celebrity and known to be reclusive, making the event a bit of a coup. The proprietor of the store, a tiny woman of about sixty, waited patiently like everyone else for him to begin.
Robert fumed silently. He swayed nervously before the crowd, dressed in grey jeans and a black cashmere sweater – head adorned by a duckbill cap he’d neglected to remove. It represented the very last barrier behind which he could hide. Shifting his weight between feet, he looked as if he might’ve had to pee. He had no reason to be anxious, really. The crowd had come to see and hear him, the writer they so admired. Breathing deeply, he tried to calm his nerves enough to get started. The crowd looked increasingly impatient as he stood fidgeting with a copy of the book, fashioning dog ears on its cover. If they had had any idea how personal the book was, they might have empathized more. They didn’t.
The guests also couldn’t be privy to the frantic deliberation in Robert’s head. How much should I reveal? The Hermit deserves his privacy. While he wished to respect that, Robert felt the book needed to be written. He felt pride in the work, sure, but more importantly, Robert hoped it would speak to readers, particularly those with exposure to grief and depression — their own, or that suffered by friends or family.
Robert lifted his cap, ran his hand through his hair, and looked back at the crowd to gauge their level of restlessness — another stall tactic. Scanning the room, he spied a striking woman standing near the back of the store. She looked at Robert without blinking and gave him a warm and knowing smile, crow’s feet framing her kind eyes. The innocuous gesture was the catalyst he needed. Robert’s chest rose as he gathered a breath. He began.
“Thank you all for coming here today. The weather didn’t cooperate, and I’m not doing much better.” His voice crackled, but he gained confidence once he saw a few smiles. “I am grateful that you took the time to join us here. I presume you’ve bought and read my book already. If you did,” he added, “then by my rough calculation, I’ve broken even on the cost of gas to travel up here today.” Subdued laughter at a volume appropriate to a library, or its retail equal, filled the bookstore. “This is the first time I’ve read The Hermit of Carmel aloud, and I’m a little apprehensive. I’ve dreamed of doing this though, right here in Carmel, for a while. Thank you for making it a reality. I’m humbled and honored.”
Robert dipped his head – a deferential bow to the crowd. From the corner of his eye, he noticed Levitt grin, color returning to his face. He paused, took a sip of water, and glanced at his wrist without consciously noting the time. More than anything, he was checking to ensure his watch was still there. He had lost it once and wouldn’t allow it to happen a second time.
Levitt waved his hand and mouthed the words, “Take off your hat.”
Robert removed his cap and continued: “For those who don’t already know, this is a true story. Narrative nonfiction, publishers call it. Some folks living in the area might know parts of the story. You might have even caught a glimpse of the Hermit. I’m quite sure that none of you truly knew him, though. I’m uncertain that anyone really did. He was a complicated man who meant well but had been hobbled by sadness and a profound sense of loss.
“You know,” he continued, “I try not to be judgmental. People process grief in sometimes unproductive ways. The Hermit’s loss triggered a deep depression, which drove him into the woods. In the quiet of the forest, he battled his private demons, the physical elements, and a few locals. It’s hard to say what saved him – his inner strength, or the game of golf. Perhaps a little of both.”
Holding the copy of his book slightly aloft, as a preacher might a Bible, Robert spoke with equal reverence. “This is his story.” He paused, unintentionally adding to the dramatic effect. “I’m not sure what you folks want from this afternoon. Was there a section or chapter you’d like me to read, or would you rather hear small excerpts from a few different chapters?” He looked around the room, hoping for a response.
After a moment of uncomfortable quiet, a speaker, unseen by the author, broke the silence. “Just read, please,” she said, in a restrained and respectful way. All heads nodded in agreement. And he did, from the start, in his best narrative voice. The room became quiet again and Robert perceived that the crowd collectively leaned in – just a bit.

Gregory Phipps was a venture capitalist but has now turned his attention to writing full time. This piece is an excerpt from his debut novel, The Hermit of Carmel. His second novel, Oak, was originally written as a screenplay and was awarded semi-finalist status at the Landlocked Film Festival. Gregory now lives in London, Ontario, with his wife Lyndsey and their dog Pippi: a sheepadoodle (yes, there's such a thing).

See Brian Henry’s schedule hereincluding writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Cambridge, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Saint John, NB, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Fall Creative Writing Courses, Introductory to Intensive, plus Writing Personal Stories and Writing Kid Lit


Welcome to Creative Writing
Ten weeks of discovering your creative side
Thursday afternoons, 12:45 – 2:45
September 27 – November 29, 2018
Woodside Branch of the Oakville Public Library, 1274 Rebecca St, Oakville, Ontario
 This is your chance to take up writing in a warm, supportive environment. This course will open the door to writing short stories and writing dialogue, writing in first person and writing in third person, writing just for fun and writing all kinds of things. 
You’ll get a shot of inspiration every week and an assignment to keep you going till the next class. Best of all, this class will provide a zero-pressure, totally safe setting, where your words will grow and flower.
Fee:  $176.11 plus 13% hst = $199
To reserve a spot now, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

Writing Personal Stories
8 weeks of sharing and writing
Thursday evenings, 7 – 9 p.m.
October 4 – November 29, 2018
Appleby United Church, 4407 Spruce Ave, Burlington, Ontario (Map here.)
If you've ever considered writing your personal stories, this course is for you. We’ll look at memoirs, travel writing, personal essays, family history ~ personal stories of all kinds. Plus, of course, we’ll work on creativity and writing technique and have fun doing it. 
Whether you want to write a book or just get your thoughts down on paper, this weekly course will get you going. We'll reveal the tricks and conventions of telling true stories, and we’ll show you how to use the techniques of the novel to recount actual events. Weekly writing exercises and friendly feedback from the instructor will help you move forward on this writing adventure. Whether you want to write for your family and friends or for a wider public, don't miss this course.
Fee:  $167.26 plus 13% hst = $189      
To reserve your spot, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

Author Jennifer Mook-Sang, signing bookmarks
Writing Kid Lit
 ~ Picture Books to Young Adult
Friday afternoons, October 5 – November 30, 2018
1:15 – 3:15 p.m.
Glenview Church, Bethlehem Room, 1 Glenview Ave, Toronto, Ontario (Map here.)
From picture books to young adult novels, this weekly course is accessible for beginners and meaty enough for advanced writers. Through lectures, in-class assignments, homework, and feedback on your writing, we’ll give you ins and outs of writing for younger readers and set you on course toward writing your own books.
We’ll have two published children’s authors as guest speakers:
Jennifer Mook-Sang grew up in Guyana and moved to Canada when she was fourteen. While reading bedtime stories to her two sons, she fell in love with picture books and decided to write one of her own. In one of Brian Henry's classes she found the beginnings of a story. That story grew into the humorous middle-grade novel Speechless, published by Scholastic in 2015. 
Speechless won the Surrey Schools Book of the Year Award, was shortlisted for many others, and was recommended by the Ontario Library Association, the Canadian Childrens’ Book Centre, the CBC, and the TD Summer Reading Club. 
Then in October 2017, Jennifer published her first picture book Captain Monty Takes the Plunge with Kids Can Press. Captain Monty is the boldest, stinkiest pirate to sail the six or seven seas; in fact, he’s never had a bath. Naturally, the Junior Library Guild immediately selected him for its fall list of recommended books. Captain Monty has also been nominated for the Rainforest of Reading Award and Jennifer will be travelling to St. Lucia for that Festival in March.
Jennifer lives in Burlington, Ontario. You can find out more about her here. 
Speechless is available online here. And Captain Monty Takes the Plunge is available here.
Author Kira Vermond
Kira Vermond is an award-winning writer with over 1,500 articles to her name. She has been a frequent contributor to the Globe and Mail, Chatelaine, CBC and Today's Parent.
Kira is the author of four nonfiction books for young readers: Half-Truths and Brazen Lies, (read more about Half-Truths here); Why We Live Where We Live (more here);   Growing Up: Inside and Out, (nominated for on Ontario Library Association Forest of Reading Award) and The Secret Life of Money: A Kid's Guide to Cash (which was my son’s and daughter’s favourite book  the year it came out, although my kids are four years apart).
Kira lives in Guelph, Ontario. 
Course fee:  $176.11 plus 13% hst = 199
To reserve your spot, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

Intensive Creative Writing
Ten weeks towards becoming a better writer
Offered in three locations:
Tuesday afternoons, 12:30 – 2:45 p.m.
September 25 – November 27
first reading emailed Sept 18
Appleby United Church, 4407 Spruce Ave, Burlington, Ontario (Map here.)
And
Wednesday evenings, 6:45 – 9:00 p.m.
September 26 – December 5 (no class Oct 31)
first reading emailed Sept 19
St. Alban's Church, 537 Main Street, Georgetown, Ontario (in the village of Glen Williams – Map here.)
And
Friday mornings, 10:15 – 12:30, September 28 – November 30
first reading emailed Sept 21
Glenview Church, Bethlehem Room
1 Glenview Ave, Toronto, Ontario (Map here.)
Intensive Creative Writing isn't for beginners; it's for people who have been writing for a while or who have done a course or two before and are working on their own projects. Over the ten weeks of classes, you’ll be asked to bring in five pieces of your writing for detailed feedback. All your pieces may be from the same work, such as a novel in progress, or they may be stand alone pieces. You bring whatever you want to work on. 
Besides critiquing pieces, the instructor will give short lectures addressing the needs of the group, and in addition to learning how to critique your own work and receiving constructive suggestions about your writing, you’ll discover that the greatest benefits come from seeing how your classmates approach and critique a piece of writing and how they write and re-write. This is a challenging course, but extremely rewarding.
Fee: $176.11 + 13% hst = $199
To reserve your spot, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

Instructor Brian Henry has been a book editor and creative writing instructor for more than 25 years. He publishes Quick Brown Fox, Canada's most popular blog for writers, teaches creative writing at Ryerson University and has led workshops everywhere from Boston to Buffalo and from Sarnia to Saint John. Brian is the author of a children’s version of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (Tribute Publishing). But his proudest boast is that he’s has helped many of his students get published. 
Read a review of Brian's various courses and workshops here (and scroll down).

See Brian’s complete current schedule hereincluding writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Cambridge, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Saint John, NB, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Monday, July 16, 2018

Canadian literary agency Transatlantic absorbs American Jill Corcoran Agency; now has 17 agents

Sofie & Cecilia by Katherine Ashenburg,
represented by Transatlantic

Transatlantic Agency
2 Bloor Street East
Suite 3500
Toronto, Ontario, Canada 

Note: Don't ever miss a post on Quick Brown Fox. Fill in your email in the box to the right under my bio, and get each post delivered to your Inbox, and if you’re not yet on my newsletter list, send me an email, including your locale to: brianhenry@sympatico.ca ~Brian

Transatlantic Agency is expanding in the US, absorbing Jill Corcoran Literary Agency. Jill Corcoran, president of JCLA, joins Transatlantic as partner and senior agent Jodell Sadler joins as senior agent; and Timothy Travaglini and Elizabeth Benneet join as literary agents. Jill Corcoran clients will move with their agents and be represented by Transatlantic going forward.
“Jill Corcoran is a powerhouse and her dynamic agents are well respected for good reason,” says Samantha Haywood, president of Transatlantic. “Jill, Jodell, Elizabeth and Tim have terrific industry experience and excellent taste. They will be a great addition to our group. We are simply delighted to welcome them and their remarkable author and illustrator clients to Transatlantic, growing our already successful children’s and YA list, and increasing our presence in the US market.”
Transatlantic now has 17 agents located across North America, with US agents in New York, Boston, Chicago, Portland OR, and LA, and Canadian agents in Toronto, Vancouver and Nova Scotia. Transatlantic represents more than 500 clients, who make regular appearances on notable bestseller lists across North America and have won major awards such as the Newbery Medal (US), the Giller Prize (Canada), Michael L. Printz Honor Book (US), and the Governor General’s Award for both adult and children’s literature (Canada).

Transatlantic agents who are looking for new authors include:

Stephanie Sinclair, is growing her own author list and simultaneously manages international rights for Samantha Haywood's client list as well as for Page Two Books, a separate company owned and operated by Transatlantic agents Jesse Finkelstein and Trena White.
In fiction, Stephanie represents literary fiction and upmarket women’s and will consider literary thriller and suspense and YA crossover. 
In nonfiction, Stephanie represents narrative nonfiction, memoir, investigative journalism and true crime.
Attach a 20-page writing sample in Word or PDF format. See Stephanie’s full guidelines here.
Note: Stephanie will be a guest speaker at the How to Get Published workshop, Saturday, Nov 17, in Mississauga. Details here.

Léonicka Valcius recently joined the Transatlantic Agency as assistant agent. After completing the publishing program at Centennial College, Léonicka interned at HarperCollins Canada before working at Scholastic Book Fairs Canada for nearly 4 years as a book buyer and marketer. She then joined the Online and Digital Sales team at Penguin Random House Canada where she sold ebooks and audio books. Léonicka is eager to draw from these experiences to return to her original passion: working with writers.
As the founder of #DiverseCanLit and the Chair of the Board of the Festival of Literary Diversity, serving readers and writers of colour has been the core of Léonicka’s career. She brings this same mandate to her work at Transatlantic. As an Assistant Agent, Léonicka will be working closely with Samantha Haywood, Stephanie Sinclair and Amy Tompkins with whom she will be co-agenting new clients.
Léonicka is interested in commercial fiction (especially fantasy, romance, and historical fiction), general nonfiction, and YA & children’s books.
In Adult and Young Adult fiction, Léonicka likes fun commercial fiction, romance that ranges from sweet to steamy, otherworldly fantasy, and sweeping historical fiction. She does not represent mysteries or thrillers.
In Adult non-fiction, she like narrative nonfiction that explains complex issues through the lens of a personal story. She is also seeking books that straddle the self-help/lifestyle line (#selfcare #liveyourbestlife) and the self-help/business line (#productivityhack #riseandgrind).
For Middle Grade, she loves humour, adventure, and make believe. She also enjoys stories about children navigating their changing relationships with family and friends. She strongly prefers books with at least one human character.
“I am eager to work with people of color,” says Léonicka, “including (but not limited to) trans people, disabled people, religious minorities, and queer folks.
Query Léonicka at: leonicka@transatlanticagency.com
Include a synopsis and a 20-page excerpt.
If you are comfortable, please include your social and cultural identities in your bio, especially if you self-identify as a person of color and/or part of another underrepresented group. If you are submitting a nonfiction proposal, please include information about your expertise and platform, as well as a detailed table of contents.

Jesse Finkelstein specializes in upmarket, accessible nonfiction that challenges current conceptions, whether through a “big ideas” book or narrative. “I am drawn to entrepreneurs and people who are innovators in their fields and writing about current affairs, business, culture, politics, technology, religion, and the environment,” says Jesse. And she is most interested in authors who have an existing platform.
Authors are encouraged to attach a maximum 20-page writing sample of their work as a Word document. See Jesse’s full guidelines here.

Trena White specializes in upmarket, accessible nonfiction that challenges current conceptions, whether through a “big ideas” book or narrative. 
“I am drawn to entrepreneurs and people who are innovators in their fields and writing about current affairs, business, culture, politics, technology, and the environment,” says Trena. 
“Journalists who are obsessed with a particular beat (gangs, climate change, etc.) always welcome. Fascinating, exceptionally well written life stories, usually with a current affairs hook. I am most interested in authors who have an existing platform.
Authors are encouraged to embed a maximum 20-page writing sample in their email. No attachments. See Trena’s full guidelines here.

Jodell Sadler is always looking for outstanding storytellers in children’s lit. She seeks new talent and artists who have animation or design or graphic novel in their background, and are looking to launch author-illustrator projects in fiction and/or nonfiction.
She also wants awesome author-illustrators working on older genre projects.
In Chapter Books and Middle Grade she’s looking for illustrated, fresh, and graphic novel, biographies, narrative nonfiction, and great stories that pull readers in.
For Picture Books, she looks for humor, well-paced writing with a fresh approach, and projects with great visual storytelling and emotional depth. “I’m looking for diverse books, biographies and great topics and concepts.”
For Young Adult she’s seeking compelling narrative nonfiction and fiction projects. “I look for a well-paced story and unique project with voice and emotional depth. I want to feel the heart of your story and immediately connect to character.”
Jodell does take on adult titles but is highly selective and looks for an awesome voice.
Query Jodell here.
Author-illustrators please submit a portfolio link or dummy.

Jill Corcoran, formerly president of the Jill Corcoran Agency and now a partner and senior agent at Transatlantic, is looking for original, compelling concepts in children’s, YA and adult fiction and non-fiction.
Query Jill here.
Do not send queries to the Corcoran Agency email addresses; they’ll be deleted.

Elizabeth Bennett is currently closed for submissions but will be open again in the fall.
Elizabeth is generally interested in fiction and nonfiction submissions with series and franchise potential, board books, novelties, graphic novels, middle grade, and YA fiction. I tend to be partial to books with humor; books that approach contemporary issues in a fresh, new way; books that are inspired by pop-culture and current trends. I’m very interested in finding young chapter books and early readers, especially illustrated projects. If you are submitting as an author-illustrator, you must include a link to your online portfolio and/or dummy as a sample of your work.
Query Elizabeth here.

Marilyn Biderman is closed to queries until Sept 1, 2018. Then Marilyn will be open to literary fiction and sweet-spot fiction, that is, fiction that’s accessible but literary in intent (often found at book clubs). She’s also looking for literary crime fiction and women’s commercial and historical fiction.
“I love memoir with an utterly unique story and brilliant writing,” says Marilyn. Plus “narrative non-fiction on compelling and newsworthy topics that anticipate trends; expert non-fiction of wide appeal from authors with established social media platforms; and biographies of fascinating lives.” 
She welcomes both debut and established authors and diverse voices.
Attach a brief sample of your work (up to 1,500 words) as a Word of PDF file. See Marilyn’s full guidelines here.

Andrea Cascardi, who represents both children’s authors and author-illustrators and adult authors, both for fiction and nonfiction is temporarily closed to queries. But writers should keep an eye on her bio page at Transatlantic for when she’s again open to queries. See here.

See Transatlantic’s submissions page here and agent bios here.


Yasmin Uçar, senior editor,
Kids Can Press
If you’re interested in getting published, soon or somewhere down the road, don’t miss upcoming  How to Get Published workshops on Saturday, Aug 18, in Collingwood with literary agent Paige Sisley (see here) and Saturday, Nov 17, in Mississauga with literary agent Stephanie Sinclair (see here). 

For updated listing of How to Get Published workshops, see here (and scroll down).

And if you’re interested in Writing for Children & for Young Adults, Brian Henry will lead a mini-conference with Yasemin Uçar, senior editor at Kids Can Press, children’s author Kira Vermond, and YA author Tanaz Bhathena, Saturday, Sept 22, in Oakville (see here), a Writing Kid Lit weekly course on Friday afternoons, Oct 5 – Nov 30 in Toronto (see here), and a Writing for Children & for Young Adults workshop Saturday, October 12, in Sudbury (see here).
For updated listings of Writing for Children & for Young adult workshops and for weekly Kid lit classes, see here (and scroll down).

And don't miss:  How to Write Great Characters, Saturday, Aug 18, in Guelph (see here), Writing Conflict: Fight scenes, Dialogue scenes & Love scenes, Saturday, Sept 15, in Toronto (see here), and Writing and Revising, Saturday, Sept 29, in St. Catharines (see here).

Come September, Brian is leading a full roster of courses, Introductory to Intense (Details of all six courses here):
Welcome to Creative Writing, Thursday, afternoons, Sept 27 - Nov 9, in Oakville. See here.
Writing Personal Stories, Thursday evenings, Oct 4 – Nov 29, in Burlington. Sees here.
Writing Kid Lit, Friday afternoons, Oct 5 – Nov 30, in Toronto. See here.
And Intensive Creative Writing, offered in three locales:
Tuesday afternoons, Sept 25 – Nov 27 (first readings emailed Sept 18), in Burlington. See here.
Wednesday evenings Sept 26 – Dec 5 (first readings emailed Sept 19), in Georgetown. See here.
Friday mornings Sept 28 – Nov 30 (first readings emailed Sept 21), in Toronto. See hereSee details of all six courses here.

To reserve a spot in any workshop, or weekly course, email brianhenry@sympatico.ca
Read reviews of Brian’s courses and workshops here.

See Brian’s complete current schedule hereincluding writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Cambridge, Georgetown, Guelph, Hamilton, Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Saint John, NB, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Navigation tips: Always check out the labels underneath a post; they’ll lead you to various distinct collections of postings. Also, if you're searching for a literary agent who represents a particular type of book, check out this post.