Monday, August 15, 2022

Coach House Books seeks literary fiction and nonfiction and poetry

Pacifique, a novel by Sarah L. Taggart
published by Coach House

Coach House Books

80 bpNichol Lane
Toronto, Ontario M5S 3J4
Canada

https://chbooks.com/

Coach House has been around since 1965 when it was founded by Stan Bevington, who is still the publisher. Alana Wilcox is the Editorial director. She’s responsible for acquisitions and editing, in addition to overseeing day-to-day operations. She is the author of A Grammar of Endings (The Mercury Press, 2000).

Coach house publishes about ten books a year of innovative poetry, literary fiction, drama and select nonfiction (and also dramatic works, but currently they’re not those).

They do not publish children’s books, cookbooks, fantasy, historical romances, memoirs, mysteries, science fiction or self-help books.

In regard to poetry, Coach House is interested in interested in work that reconsiders or pushes against convention. They go by the dictum of poet Bob Cobbing, who says: “The only excuse for being a poet today is to add to the quality of poetry, to add a quality which was not there before.”

Coach House primarily publishes Canadian authors. (Grants depend on this.) Like everyone else they “especially encourage submissions from members of diverse communities, including Indigenous writers, writers of colour, writers with disabilities, writers from the LGBTQ community, and writers who identify with other marginalized groups.”

Test Piece, poetry by Sheryda Warrener
published by Coach House

For fiction submissions, send your complete manuscript, along with an introductory letter that describes your work and compares it to at least two current Coach House titles, explaining how your book would fit their list, and a literary CV listing your previous publications and relevant experience. Please include these all in one file (Word or PDF).

For poetry submissions, send your complete manuscript, along with an introductory letter that describes your work and compares it to at least two current Coach House titles, explaining how your book would fit their list, and a literary CV listing your previous publications and relevant experience. Please include these all in one file (Word or PDF). Please do not send single poems; they’re looking for full length (book length) works to publish.

For nonfiction submissions, please send a brief proposal and outline, along with your literary CV, and either a sample of the work, or samples of previous relevant writing.

Please advise in your cover letter if your work is a simultaneous submission (submitted to other publishers at the same time). Notify Coach House promptly if it is accepted elsewhere.

Email your submission tosubmissions@chbooks.com 

In one file, attach your manuscript/excerpt and literary CV. Please include the genre and title of your submission in the subject of the email. 

Full submission guidelines here.

Children's author Kira Vermond will be one of
the guest speakers for the Writing Kid Lit class

Brian Henry's schedule continues to take shape….

Weekly classes {Details of all fall classes here}: 

In-person: Enjoying Creative Writing, Thursday evenings, 7 – 9 p.m., Sept 29 – Nov 24, in Burlington. Details here.

Online: Enjoying Creative Writing, Tuesday afternoons, 12:30 – 2:30, Oct 11 – Dec 6, 2022 {Or to Dec 13 if the course fills up.} Details here.

Writing Kid Lit weekly class, Wednesday evenings, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m., Oct 12 – Dec 7, 2022 {Or to Dec 14 if the course fills up}. Details here.

Online: Writing Personal Stories, Monday afternoons, Monday afternoons, 12:30 – 2:30, Oct 24 – Dec 5, 2022 {Or to Dec 12 if the course fills up.) Details here

Online: Intensive Creative Writing, Tuesday evenings, 6:30 – 9:00 p.m., Sept 20 – Dec 6, 2022 {Or to Dec 13 if the course fills up. No class Oct 4}. Details of all fall classes here. – Still space in this Intensive class.

Online: Intensive Creative Writing also offered: Wednesday afternoons, Sept 14 – Dec 14, 2022, and Friday mornings, Sept 23 – Dec 16, 2022. Details of all fall classes here. But waiting list only for these two Intensive classes

In-person: Extreme Creative Writing, Thursday evenings, Sept 29 – Dec 1, in Burlington. Details here.

Writing Retreats:


Lake Simcoe Writing Retreat at The Briars, Friday, Sept 16 – Monday Sept 19, 2022. Enjoy a weekend of writing at an elegant southern Ontario resort. Details here.

Muskoka Writing Retreat at Sherwood Inn, Friday, Oct 14 – Monday Oct 17, 2022. Details here. (This retreat may be full. But there's still space at the Briar's Retreat in September!)

To reserve a spot or for more details about any course, workshop or retreat, email brianhenry@sympatico.ca

Navigation tips: Always check out the Labels underneath a post; they’ll lead you to various distinct collections of postings. For book publishers in general, see here {and scroll down}. For more children’s and young adult publishers, see here {and scroll down}.

Saturday, August 13, 2022

Online Intensive Creative Writing class Tuesday evenings, Sept 20 – Dec 6

Intensive Creative Writing

 ~ Grow as a writer

Space still available for Tuesday evening class: 
Tuesday evenings, 6:30 – 9:00 p.m.
Sept 20 – Dec 6, 2022 {Or to Dec 13 if the course fills up. No class Oct 4}
Offered on Zoom and accessible from anywhere there's internet.

Wednesday afternoon and Friday morning Intensive classes – waiting list only.

Note: See all writing classes offered this fall, including Enjoying Creative Writing, Writing Personal Stories, and Writing Kid Lit, here

Intensive Creative Writing isn't for beginners; it's for people who have been writing for a while or who have done a course or two before and are working on their own projects. You’ll be asked to bring in five pieces of your writing for detailed feedback, including three long pieces. All your pieces may be from the same work, such as a novel in progress, or they may be stand alone pieces. You bring whatever you want to work on. 

Besides critiquing pieces, the instructor will give short lectures addressing the needs of the group, and in addition to learning how to critique your own work and receiving constructive suggestions about your writing, you’ll discover that the greatest benefits come from seeing how your classmates approach and critique a piece of writing and how they write and re-write. This is a challenging course, but extremely rewarding.

Fee: $229.20 + hst = $259

To reserve your spot, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

Instructor Brian Henry has been a book editor and creative writing instructor for more than 25 years. He publishes Quick Brown Fox, Canada's most popular blog for writers, teaches creative writing at Ryerson University and has led workshops everywhere from Boston to Buffalo and from Sarnia to Saint John. But his proudest boast is that he’s has helped many of his students get published.  

Read reviews of Brian's various courses and workshops here (and scroll down).

See all of Brian’s upcoming weekly writing classes, one-day workshops, and weekend retreats here.


Friday, August 12, 2022

“The good movie star“ by Beverly Dywan

I knew, in grade one, that nuns were named after movie stars.

I had proof: my teacher, Sister Annette, was a nun, in the full regalia with the long black outfit, white starched headpiece forcing her skin back like Marlene Dietrich’s home made facelift tape. She did seem beautiful, sparkling eyes and toothy smile, but very old, it was hard to tell just how old.

The black veil was an extravagant bit of fluff – an elbow length swath of cotton fabric, carefully trained to swing when her head did, like a full skirt, but attached to her head. I could see a bit of the coif she wore under the veil, to keep her hair covered and manageable. Sometimes her dark tresses slipped out….we noticed.

The big white wimple, starting under her chin and extending like a cape adhered to her chest – similar to those you get when you go to Red Lobster – was fabricated from pure starch, bleached daily, and never, ever worn when it was convent spaghetti night. Us girls thought that red gingham was probably the back-up plan for these occasions.

Some of the other, pretty, civilian teachers were full glam, even sometimes with tulle layers to expand the shape away from their form, high heels, nails painted. The full swell seemed to be a fashionable trend, and seeing a woman’s form at school was definitely frowned upon by the sisters. I wondered if all the teachers  nuns and civilians  went to the same store, the nuns directed to the black and white area, where skirts became the full billowing upside down egg cup, covering every bit of flesh, and only ever dirtied by chalk from the blackboard.

The habit, (which is what they wore every day so that’s why they called it that) was complete once the rosary was added – usually as a belt. It clicked and clattered when they walked down the hallway, so you always knew when they were coming. Sometimes, too the nuns wore sandals, but to be practical they usually wore black oxfords, tied up tightly, shoes shiny, worn from many years’ use. I thought that if they indeed were named after movie stars, they might want to step up their shoe game. I mean, had anyone ever seen Lucille Ball wearing oxfords? Sandals were better, but ... winter.

Nuns were nice, at least when you were in grade one. They were always singing or praying or rushing along, swooshing. I remember Sister Louise, the principal at St. Monica’s, where my brothers and I went to school. My oldest brother was too old to be there, my younger sister, too young. So it was just the three of us. Sister Louise always seemed kind of nice to me, except that I heard she had given Dave the strap. I was a little wary of her after that. 

Rockettes

My Mother said that Sister Louise had been a Rockette in New York. I imagined seeing her on stage in her habit, legs kicking high enough for the audience to see her panties. I didn’t know what movie star was named Louise, but I was confident that our principal would have chosen wisely, and I probably just didn’t know enough about Hollywood to figure it out. Maybe it was an actress from a gangster movie, explaining her proficiency with a belt.

Mickey Mouse reruns were on TV, and my sister and I were entranced by the performers on our little black and white screen. They were the best singers, dancers and comics I’d ever seen, in my six-year life. They were exuberant, great to look at, fashionable, young and fun.

Annette Funicello stood out like a beacon. Dark curly hair, perky and playful. A wise choice of name for a nun. I began to wonder if nuns wore bikinis under their habits. A bikini and oxfords sounded like a fashion faux pas, so I assumed that in the summer, when a bikini was definitely an option, they would be wearing summer sandals. In the winter, I think they put thick cotton tights over whatever it was that covered their private parts. And always a long black wool coat. Even Rockettes got cold.

One special morning, my favourite activity doing creative stuff, Sister Annette surely noticed that I went into an art trance when we were asked to decorate a large banner where a gigantic autumn tree was drawn. We were instructed to decorate it with colourful paper leaves. I just kept at it, carefully smearing glue paste all over the back of each individual leaf, adding them to the billowing mushroom treetop and beyond. 

As little people, we had a very small area in which to work – we were on the floor, we kneeled and reached as far as we could, and couldn’t see the overall picture. My leaves extended well beyond the black line defining the puffy cloud-like shape. In fact they were all over the place, I had no regard for the full picture, I just wanted to see how many orange or red leaves I could glue and stick.

Sister Annette milled around the area, commenting and helping those who couldn’t figure out how to glue without a volcanic overflow of white Elmer’s staining the parquet tiles.  When she arrived over my shoulder, I heard a small gasp.

“You’ve gone outside the lines!” (This would become a familiar refrain in my life.)

I looked up, and realized that there were rules I hadn’t understood. I thought I may have ruined the wall-sized image, which was to be a fall decoration for our room.

Sister Annette regained her composure then said, “I suppose you have correctly shown leaves falling from the tree. Do you think there was some wind that got them loose from the branches, and they started to fly away?”

Yes, I nodded, feeling mortified but somehow approved at the same time. I’ve always been so sensitive about my art.

Sister Annette was just as fun and nice as Annette Funicello. Her hidden bikini was probably black, to match her habit. She seemed to have a good sense of style, the way her jaunty wimple seemed so perfectly tidy, giving her a cult-like essence of authority.  

She could take off her veil and put her head straight into a bathing cap, I could see how practical that was. I wondered if she would come swimming at Eglinton Park with me next summer. She could bring snacks (communion hosts), and I could bring drinks (old wine from my parent’s liquor cabinet). It would be wonderful, but I was too shy to ask.

Grade one was very formative, indoctrinating the Catholicism our parents had sent us here to learn. Before summer came, after an eventful year including concerts performed for parents in which I wet my pants onstage, a book club ranking pupils by their ability (I was in “the Jets,” although “the Planets” books looked very enticing), a Valentine’s ring from Kevin Sullivan, lots of visits to church, our first communions and many assemblies where we got to sit in the front row because we were so important, and coincidentally the youngest and smallest students in the school.

We memorized our rote catechism: Q. “Who made us?” A. “God made us.” Q. “Who is God? A. “God is the string bean who made all things.” I think I possibly misheard that last answer, but we all said it that way.

On our very last day, we lined up to say goodbye, the girls in our tunics, the boys in semi-clean shirts and pants. Sister Annette shook each boy’s hand, giving her final blessing: “Goodbye Tom, I will see you in heaven with St. Thomas.” She hugged each girl, “Goodbye Patty, I will see you in heaven with St. Patricia.” Twenty children ahead of me in line, twenty saints named. Until me. She seemed to have stumbled onto a gap in her logic.

“Goodbye Beverly, I’ll see you in … oh dear I don’t think there is a St. Beverly. Oh well, have a nice life, dear.”

What would Annette Funicello do?

***

Beverly Dywan is a professional exhibit, experience and strategy designer for museums, with clients throughout North America and in Hong Kong. Bev also enjoys painting, sculpting and writing. She lives part time “up the Bruce,” in Tobermory, Ontario, a beautiful, rugged landscape, on Lake Huron. She teaches Design at OCAD University in Toronto. She has taken several courses with Brian, and highly recommends it!

See Brian Henry’s upcoming weekly writing classes, one-day workshops, and weekend retreats here.

Wednesday, August 10, 2022

In-person: Extreme Creative Writing course, Thursday afternoons, Sept 29 – Dec 1 in Burlington

Extreme Creative Writing

 ~ For more experienced writers 

In-person: Thursday afternoons, 12:30 – 3:00 p.m
Sept 29 – Dec 1, 2022, and adding another week or two if the course fills up {no class Oct 13}

St. Elizabeth’s Anglican Church, 5324 Bromley Road, Burlington, Ontario {Map here
Note: Given the unpredictable nature of the pandemic, it's possible this class could be forced online.

See details of all weekly writing courses offered this fall here.

Extreme Creative Writing is for experienced writers who have been writing for a while or who have done courses before and are working on their own projects. You’ll be asked to bring in five pieces of your writing for detailed feedback, including three long pieces. All your pieces may be from the same work, such as a novel in progress, or they may be stand alone pieces. You bring whatever you want to work on. 

Besides critiquing pieces, we’ll have discussions on topics of interest to the class. In addition to learning how to critique your own work and receiving constructive suggestions about your writing, you’ll discover that the greatest benefits come from seeing how your classmates approach and critique a piece of writing and how they write and re-write. This is a challenging course, but extremely rewarding.

Fee: $229.20 + hst = $259

To reserve your spot, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

Instructor Brian Henry has been a book editor and creative writing instructor for more than 25 years. He publishes Quick Brown Fox, Canada's most popular blog for writers, teaches creative writing at Ryerson University and has led workshops everywhere from Boston to Buffalo and from Sarnia to Saint John.  But his proudest boast is that he’s has helped many of his students get published.  

Read reviews of Brian's various courses and workshops here {and scroll down}.

See all of Brian’s upcoming weekly writing classes, one-day workshops, and weekend retreats here. 

Tuesday, August 9, 2022

Triada has five literary agents looking for new authors - picture books, middle grade, young adult and adult fiction and nonfiction

My Mechanical Romance
by Alexene Farol Follmuth
represented by Triada

Triada US Literary Agency

PO Box 561
Sewickley, PA 15143

https://www.triadaus.com/

Note: Don't ever miss what’s happening with Quick Brown Fox. If you’re not yet on my newsletter, send me an email, including your locale to:  brianhenry@sympatico.ca   ~Brian

Triada US has five agents, all of whom are open to submissions, both fiction and nonfiction, for adults, picture books, middle grade, and young adults.

Triada strives to make their response time to queries the fastest in the industry: “On average, we respond to submissions in one week. Many agencies can take several months to respond to even solicited submissions. We will respond promptly. If you do not hear from us within two weeks, we did not receive your query. We also encourage you to check with us regularly via email about the progress of your submission. Lastly, if we request a full manuscript and ultimately decide to reject it, we will explain to you our reasons for doing so.”

Amelia Appel joined Triada after previously assisting at McIntosh & Otis, Inc., and Writers House. She was recently promoted to agent and is actively seeking adult fiction, nonfiction, and YA. Fantastic settings and savvy characters are her favorite things, and like everyone else, she is “particularly interested in stories by diverse and marginalized voices.”

For adult fiction, she is most interested in the following:

Literary fiction (particularly if it has a great voice and explores complex relationships).
Mystery (especially proper whodunits; bonus points for fun, close-quarter settings).

Thriller (twisty, suspenseful, but no cop protagonists).
Upmarket women's fiction (preferably without a marriage- or children-related focus).
Science fiction (no space operas).
Fantasy (and magical realism).
Horror (the scarier the better).
Graphic novels (especially where the form adds further layers to the story).

For adult nonfiction, she's most drawn to projects that relay new information in an engaging way, primarily in the areas of creative nonfiction, humor, sports, how-to, pop culture, and true crime.

Lastly, for YA, she's most looking for a combination of light and dark elements and stories where the protagonist is compelled to change.

To submit, please use Amelia's Query Manager here.
 

Lauren Spieller came to Triada with a background in literary scouting and editorial consulting and is now agent. She has a sharp editorial eye and is passionate about author advocacy. Lauren is seeking Middle Grade, Young Adult, and Adult fiction, as well as platform-driven nonfiction. Like everyone else, Lauren is passionate about representing diverse and underrepresented voices.

Middle Grade: Lauren is looking for high concept contemporaries, magical fantasy and kid-friendly sci-fi, exciting historical, and spooky horror! She'd also love to find a MG graphic novel, especially if it's set in our real world. A few favorites: Tristan Strong Punches a Hole in the Sky, King and the Dragonflies, The Prince and the Dressmaker, Jonathan Auxier, Kelly Barnhill, and Natalie Lloyd.

Young Adult: Lauren is especially drawn to books with a strong voice and a great hook. She loves fantasy (all types!), contemporary, suspense/thrillers, and horror. She is a sucker for a smart genre-bending tale, and would love to see more romcoms. A few favorites: The Wilder Girls, Female of the Species, Jenny Han, Maggie Stiefvater, Julie Murphy, Leah Johnson.

In Adult, Lauren is seeking female-driven suspense/ thrillers (The Lion's Den, Lucy Foley, Gillian Flynn, Oyinkan Braithwaite), immersive, upmarket SFF (Mexican Gothic, Gideon the Ninth, The Vanished Birds, Jade CityThe Ten Thousand Doors of January). She is also seeking hilarious RomComs (Dial A For Aunties, The Hating Game, and Red, White and Royal Blue), and unique nonfiction with an existing platform (Ijeoma Oluo, Jenny Lawson, Lindsey West).

To submit, please use Lauren’s Query Manager here.

Brent Taylor is a Senior Literary Agent. His tastes can best be described as upmarket: stories that are extremely well-written, robust with emotion, and appeal to a wide, commercial audience. 

He is seeking smart, fun, and heartfelt books in the following categories: picture books, chapter books, middle grade, young adult, and graphic novels for kids and teens. His favorite books include: Charlotte's WebThe Thing About JellyfishThe Vast Fields of Ordinary, Please Ignore Vera Dietz, and The Westing Game.

Query Brent at: brent@triadaus.com

Include the first ten pages in the body of the email and put "query" in the subject line.

Laura Crockett is a Literary Agent. She’s interested in a variety of YA and adult fiction.

In YA, she is interested in contemporary realistic fiction (romcoms, fierce feminists, strong family/friendship dynamics, light-hearted and humorous, interesting jobs/hobbies, hopeful), historical (original, accessible, unique, uncharted areas of female and/or non-Western history), and fantasy (fractured fairytales, culturally-influenced folklore, historically-inspired, elemental magic, lush world-building).

Some favorite titles include Fangirl, When Dimple Met Rishi, Royals, Dumplin', The Lie Tree, Shadowfell, The Star-Touched Queen, Outrun the Moon, Prisoner of Night & Fog, The Bird and the Blade, A Madness So Discreet, Walk on Earth a Stranger, Jackaby, and Hunted.

In adult fiction, she is interested in fantasy (inspired by historical/cultural events and folklore, in-depth world-building and authentic characterizations, ensemble casts and solo protagonists, epic and low), historical fiction (spotlight on feminism, STEM, spies and code-breaking, non-Western and little-known eras, parallel narratives), and women's fiction (romcom, millennial-driven, slice of life, compelling obstacles and moral dilemmas).

Some favorites include The City of Brass, Uprooted, Daughter of the Forest, Priory of the Orange Tree, Kings of the Wyld, Queen of Blood, In Another Time, A Secret History of Witches, The Winter Witch, Ten Thousand Doors of January, The Familiars, Shadow on the Crown, The Alice Network, Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine, Ayesha at Last, A Window Opens, Kate Morton, Abby Jimenez, Mhairi McFarlane, and Sophie Kinsella.

She's a character-driven reader seeking voice-y narratives and compelling stakes. Like everyone else, she's always interested in diversity.

Query Laura at: laura@triadaus.com

Include the first ten pages in the body of the email, with "Query" included in the subject line.

Dr. Uwe Stender is President of Triada US and a Literary Agent. He’s interested in all kinds of nonfiction and fiction. 

In nonfiction, he is completely open to any project, from Memoir (writers with huge platform only for memoir), Pop Culture, and Health to How-to, Gardening, History and everything in between, including nonfiction for children.

In Children's fiction, he is looking for YA, Graphic Novels, and MG.

In adult fiction, his tastes trend towards Women's Fiction, Psychological Suspense, and Mysteries.  As an immigrant to the USA himself, he is always eager to bring projects from underrepresented voices into the world. So surprise him, his tastes are eclectic, and he may just love what you wrote!

His favorite six books right now are: To All The Boys I’ve Loved Beore, Field Notes On Love, The Underground RailroadDer Blutrote Teppich, Olympia, and Americanah.

You can find him on Twitter @UweStenderPhD

Query Uwe at: uwe@triadaus.com 

Include just the query in the body of the email.

Full submission guidelines here.

Picture Book author Lana Button
will be one of the guest speakers for 
the Kid Lit weekly course this fall

If you’re interested in writing for children or for young adults, don't miss the online Writing Kid Lit workshop, with Kids Can Press senior editor Patricia Ocampo and children's author Jennifer Mook- Sang. August 13. Details here

And in the fall, join us for an online Writing Kid Lit weekly class, Wednesday evenings, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m., Oct 12 – Dec 7, 2022 {Or to Dec 14 if the course fills up}. Details here.

Beyond that, Brian's schedule continues to take shape:

Online: Writing and Revising, Sunday, August 14. Details here.

Weekly classes {Details of all fall classes here}: 

Online: Enjoying Creative Writing, Tuesday afternoons, 12:30 – 2:30, Oct 11 – Dec 6, 2022 {Or to Dec 13 if the course fills up.} Details here.

In-person: Enjoying Creative Writing, Thursday evenings, 7 – 9 p.m., Sept 29 – Nov 24, in Burlington. Details here.

Online: Writing Personal Stories, Monday afternoons, Monday afternoons, 12:30 – 2:30, Oct 24 – Dec 5, 2022 {Or to Dec 12 if the course fills up.) Details here

Online: Intensive Creative Writing, Tuesday evenings, 6:30 – 9:00 p.m., Sept 20 – Dec 6, 2022 {Or to Dec 13 if the course fills up. No class Oct 4}. Details of all fall classes here.

Online: Intensive Creative Writing, Wednesday afternoons, 12:30 – 3:00 p.m., Sept 14 – Dec 7, 2022 {Or to Dec 14 if it’s fill. No class Oct 5}. Details of all fall classes here.

Online: Intensive Creative Writing, Friday mornings, 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., Sept 23 – Dec 9, 2022 {or to Dec 16 if the course fills up. No class Oct 14}. Details of all fall classes here.

In-person: Extreme Creative Writing, Thursday evenings, Sept 29 – Dec 1, in Burlington. Details here.

Writing Retreats:

Lake Simcoe Writing Retreat at The Briars, Friday, Sept 16 – Monday Sept 19, 2022. Enjoy a weekend of writing at an elegant southern Ontario resort. Details here.

Muskoka Writing Retreat at Sherwood Inn, Friday, Oct 14 – Monday Oct 17, 2022. Details here. (This retreat is full ~ waiting list only. But there's still space at the Briar's Retreat in September.)

The Briar's Resort

To reserve a spot or for more details about any course, workshop or retreat, email brianhenry@sympatico.ca

Navigation tips: Always check out the Labels underneath a post; they’ll lead you to various distinct collections of postings. If you're searching for more interviews with literary agents or a literary agent who represents a particular type of book, check out this post.