Saturday, September 14, 2019

Great workshops soon: How to Get Published with literary agent Meg Wheeler, Writing for Children & for Young Adults with senior editor Yasemin Uçar & author Jennifer Mook-Sang, and How to Write Great Dialoge


A Measure of Light by Beth Powning
represented by WCA
How to Get Published
An editor & a literary agent tell all
Saturday, Sept 21, 2019
1:00 – 4:00 / 4:30 p.m.
Holly Community Centre, 171 Mapleton Ave, Barrie, Ontario (Map here)
Note: "How to Get Published" is also offered Saturday, November 23, in Niagara on the Lake. See here.
If you've ever dreamed of becoming a published author, this workshop is for you. Book editor Brian Henry and literary agent Meg Wheeler will explain how to approach an agent or publisher to give your book the best possible chance. We will go deep into how to write a query letter that will get you a yes. Bring your questions. Come and get ready to be published!
Special Option: Participants are invited to bring a draft of a query letter you might use to interest an agent or publisher in your book. You don’t need to bring anything, but if you do, three copies could be helpful.
And be sure to bring your elevator pitch! Following the end of the formal workshop at about 4:00, Brian Henry will be staying for at least half an hour and helping interested attendees, rewrite their query letters, while literary agent Meg Wheeler will be listening to your pitches. Agents come to these events wanting to hear what you’ve got and hoping to find authors they want to represent.
Meg Wheeler is an Associate Agent and International Rights Director with Westwood Creative Artists, one of Canada’s largest literary agencies. It’s also one of the oldest and most respected. Clients of the agency include Mark Sakamoto, Justin Trudeau, Yann Martel, Thomas King, Rohinton Mistry, Alan Doyle, Rosemary Sullivan, and Kyo Maclear.  There are seven agents on the team:  Chris Casuccio, Jackie Kaiser, Michael A. Levine, Hilary McMahon, John Pearce, Bruce Westwood, and Meg Wheeler.
Meg’s inbox is open to submissions of all kinds, but she has a particular soft spot for literary fiction, women’s commercial fiction, and the gamut of nonfiction. She’s also interested in young adult and middle grade fiction.
Fee: $38.82 + 13% hst = $45 paid in advance or $43.36 + 13% hst = $49 at the door
To reserve a spot now, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

The Summoning a YA novel by
Kelley Armstrong a New York Times #1
bestselling author & one of Brian's students
Writing for Children and for Young Adults
  ~ The world’s hottest market
With Kids Can Press senior editor Yasemin Uçar 
and children’s author Jennifer Mook-Sang
Saturday, October 5, 2019
10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Centennial Hall, Burlington Central Library, 2331 New Street, Burlington, Ontario (Map here.)
If you want to write the next best-selling children’s books or just want to create stories for your own kids, this workshop is for you. Learn how to write stories kids and young adults will love and find out what you need to know to sell your book. We'll be quite a small group, so be sure to bring all your questions – we'll have lots of time for interaction.
Special option: You may, but don't have to, bring 3 copies of the opening couple pages (first 500 words) of your children’s book or young adult novel (or up to 750 words if that gets you to the end of your picture book or to the end of your first chapter.) If you’re not currently working on a children’s story, don’t worry, we’ll get you started on the spot!
Note: Following the formal end of the workshop at about 3:45, Yasemin will stay around to chat with you one-on-one and Brian will stay till 4:45 to help with your opening pages.
Guest speaker Yasemin Uçar is a Senior Editor at Kids Can Press. Yasemin has been a children’s book editor for over two decades. She worked at Scholastic Canada before moving to London, UK, in 2001, where she worked as a Senior Editor at Piccadilly Press. In 2006, she moved back to Toronto and worked as a freelance editor for a number of years before joining Kids Can Press in 2012.
Yasemin has worked with many popular and award-winning authors and illustrators, including internationally bestselling author Louise Rennison, Ashley Spires, Chieri Uegaki and Caroline Adderson.
Guest speaker Jennifer Mook-Sang grew up in Guyana and moved to Canada when she was fourteen. While reading bedtime stories to her two sons, she fell in love with picture books and decided to write one of her own. In one of Brian Henry's classes she found the beginnings of a story. That story grew into the humorous middle-grade novel Speechless, published by Scholastic Canada.
Speechless won the Surrey Schools Book of the Year Award, was shortlisted for many others, and was recommended by the Ontario Library Association, the Canadian Childrens’ Book Centre, the CBC, and the TD Summer Reading Club. 
Since then, Jennifer has also published a picture book, Captain Monty Takes the Plunge, with Kids Can Press. Captain Monty is the boldest, stinkiest pirate to sail the six or seven seas; in fact, he’s never had a bath. Naturally, the Junior Library Guild immediately selected him for its fall list of recommended books; it was short-listed for the Rainforest of Reading Award; and the Canadian Children’s Book Centre put it on its best books of the year list.
Jennifer has discovered another facet of being a children's author: she's traveled across Canada speaking to hordes of kids about her writing journey; encouraging them to read, write, and revise. Who knew that Brian's nudging to read aloud to the class would come in so handy someday?
Jennifer lives in Burlington, Ontario. You can find out more about her here. 
Speechless is available online here. And Captain Monty Takes the Plunge is availablehere. And of course they’re both available in book stores everywhere.
Fee: $43.36 + 13% hst = $49 paid in advance or $46.90 + 13% hst = $53  at the door
To reserve a spot now, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

How to Write Great Dialogue
Sunday, October 20, 2019
10:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
College Boreal, Room TBA, Sudbury, Ontario (Map here)
Accessible to beginners and meaty enough for experienced writers, this workshop will show you how to use dialogue to make your stories more dynamic and dramatic.
Whether you’re writing fiction or memoir, you need to be able to write great dialogue that both sounds natural and packs dramatic punch, and you need to know how to mix your dialogue and narrative so that your characters come alive. 
Come to this workshop and learn both the basics and the best tricks of the trade. 
Fee: $43.36 + 13% hst = $49 paid in advance or $46.90 + 13% hst = $53  at the door
To reserve a spot now, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

Workshop leader Brian Henry has been a book editor and creative writing instructor for more than 25 years. He publishes Quick Brown Fox, Canada’s most popular blog for writers, teaches creative writing at Ryerson University, he's led workshops everywhere from Boston to Buffalo and from Sarnia to Charlottetown, and he's the author of a children's version of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. But his proudest boast is that he has helped many of his students get their first book published and launch their careers as authors. 
See reviews of Brian's classes and workshops here.

See Brian’s complete current schedule here, including Saturday writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Alliston, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Georgetown, Georgina, Guelph, Hamilton, Jackson’s Point, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, New Tecumseth, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor,  Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.


Friday, September 13, 2019

"Not Just Any Friday" by James Bryan Simpson



I knew I should have turned left, but at the time taking the right fork had seemed a more reasonable choice. Twenty minutes later the pavement stopped, the road became narrower and the potholes got bigger and deeper. I pulled over and checked the map. The road I was on didn’t exist. Maybe I should have bought a new map instead of trusting the one I found in the glove box when I bought this second-hand truck. I refolded the map and left it on the seat next to my backpack, binoculars, binocular harness, bird identification book and phone. My phone wasn’t helpful; I’d forgotten to charge it for a few days.
     Carefully, I continued, praying that the road wouldn’t get worse. It did. A sign—partially hidden by tall grasses growing next to the dense forest beside the road—advertised a gas station and restaurant just a few kilometers ahead. Shortly, it appeared. I had to stop and find out how to get to Long Point in time to catch the migrating raptors. And use the washroom.
     The building was one step above derelict, but the washroom was cleaner than I’d expected. I walked into the dining room and approached the sole occupant who was sitting at one of the tables. He was a big man, dressed in denim, nursing a mug of coffee and reading the Toronto Sun. Reddish beard, no mustache, and—when he smiled—a gold tooth. I immediately thought of Dr. Teeth, one of my favourite characters on The Muppet Show that I used to watch on TV with my kids.
     “Which way to Long Point?” I asked.
He laughed and pointed in the direction I’d just come from. He must have heard my truck when I arrived. “Why don’t you have a cup of coffee,” he said. “Sit anywhere you want.”
     “Is there an outlet where I can charge my phone?”
He pointed at the back wall, behind a table facing the entrance. I sat down, put my phone and charger on the table and plugged them in.
     I was checking my bird book when he arrived a minute later with a mug of coffee, a plate of creamers and a bowl filled with packets of sugar and a variety of artificial sweeteners. “That may take a while,” he said, glancing at my phone. “How about a sandwich? I can cook you up a tasty western if you’d like.”
     My nose was in my book and what he said didn’t register with me right away. He stood there and waited until I put the book down, reached for the coffee and looked up.
     “Hi,” he said. “I’m Andy and I’ll be your server today. Sandwich?”
     I had to laugh. Here I was, the only customer in this tired dining room in the middle of…I don’t know where, and Andy was being polite and funny at the same time. “Sure.” Maybe I was taking a chance, but he’d put on a crisp white apron and his hands were clean, so I figured maybe the food was okay. I ordered a western sandwich, toasted, on whole-wheat bread.
     I didn’t have to wait very long. It was the best western I’d ever had. Between bites I scanned my book and glanced at my phone, watching as the battery bar indicated it was charging. Then the building began to vibrate. There was a low rumble outside, it got louder, and two minutes later it stopped.
     The front door swung open. I counted the bikers as they came in. Six of them. Each in turn embraced Andy, big bear hugs all around. That seemed natural because most of them were built like big bears.
     I was far enough away that I couldn’t hear what they were talking about as they disappeared into the kitchen. A few minutes later they reappeared, each carrying a bottle of beer. Andy followed, carrying a platter of sandwiches and a carafe of coffee. He refilled my cup, then went and refilled his mug and joined his friends.
     The golden eagle can be mistaken for the turkey vulture, but the eagle is larger and does not have the unsteady flight pattern of the vulture. I’d seen vultures soaring near Kelso Lake where Highway 401 climbs the Niagara Escarpment west of Milton. I was really hoping to see some golden eagles, and I was reading on how to differentiate the immature birds from the adults. I’d heard the migration was reaching its peak, and I thought that by arriving on Thursday I’d miss the weekend crowds. Long Point was a raptor staging area before they few across Lake Erie. About then I realized someone was standing in front of my table, blocking the light from the recessed ceiling lights. I looked up.



     “Your truck outside?” he asked.
     “Yes.” I knew Andy was big, but this man was huge. Dressed all in black leather and with a big black beard and shoulder-length hair, this was one scary dude. And I had no idea why he was talking to me.
     “You drove down that road?” he asked, and hooked a thumb over his shoulder to indicate the road I’d negotiated to find this place. I nodded. “Nasty potholes, aren’t they.”
     “Yes.”
     “You got a bent rim and your tire’s a bit flat.”
     Oh crap. Just what I didn’t need. “Oh, I didn’t know. Thanks for telling me.”
     “You got a spare on a new rim in the back. I could change it for you.”
     “You could? That would be great. Thanks. How much?”
     “You a regular customer of Andy’s?”
     “This is the first time I’ve been here. I was going to Long Point, but I got a bit lost.”
     “I heard. Like I said, you’re a regular customer, so no charge.” He smiled when he said that.
     “Thank you.”
     I didn’t realize how tense I’d been talking with him, but when he walked back to his table and tapped another biker on the shoulder and the two of them left, I felt my whole body relax. I slumped back into my chair. I could stop holding my breath. I guess being approached by a biker who outweighs you by almost two hundred pounds will do that to anybody. I was about to pick up my book again when Andy came over and refilled my coffee.
     “Does he do that often?” I asked.
     “Bill’s a good guy. He owns a tire shop. He does that for a living.”
     “That’s very kind of him.”
     “Yeah, that’s Bill.”
     Andy rejoined his friends and I started to wonder if I had a jack in the back of my truck, along with the spare tire. I couldn’t remember. Maybe Bill would borrow a jack from the gas station next door. Or maybe he’d just lift the corner of the truck and his buddy would change the tire. I guess it didn’t need to worry about it because a few minutes later Bill and his friend came back in. Bill gave me a thumbs up before he pulled out his chair and rejoined his friends. 
     About five minutes later they all stood up, gave Andy another hug, and left. I heard their bikes start up, and they all went down the road that I’d navigated to get to this place. Andy cleaned off the table, refilled his mug and resumed his reading.
     I turned on my phone and checked my email. Nothing new. I had another look at the weather for Woodstock, where I’d exited the 401. The winds were from the north, which was what I wanted. One more app to check. When I was satisfied that Google Maps was my friend, I raised my hand and Andy came over with my bill.
     “Great sandwich,” I told him as retrieved my wallet and pulled out a twenty. He just smiled. “Friends of yours?” I asked.
     “Un-huh.”
     “They seem to know this place. Do they come by regularly?”
     “A couple of times a year.”
     “Oh. So where are they going?”
     “Port Dover.”
     It all made sense now. I looked at my phone. Today was Thursday, the twelfth. Tomorrow would be Friday, the thirteenth – the day when thousands of bikers always descended on Port Dover. But if Bill was anything to go by, the bikers would be bringing good luck, not bad at all.

James Bryan Simpson is retired from a career in pharmacy and the pharmaceutical industry and now writes fiction and creative nonfiction. He enjoys country living, recreational reading, and participating in writing groups. He lives in an old stone farmhouse somewhere between Milton and Guelph.


See Brian Henry’s schedule hereincluding writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Alliston, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Georgetown, Georgina, Guelph, Hamilton, Jackson’s Point, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, New Tecumseth, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Thursday, September 12, 2019

New Book by Kira Vermond – Why Don’t Cars Run on Apple Juice?



How do stars stay in the sky? Why do my toots smell? Can a rat burp?  What is time?
Kids ask great questions. A lot of them. The Ontario Science Centre collected thought-provoking questions from their most inquisitive visitors and answered them in Why Don’t Cars Run on Apple Juice? a fun and informative Q&A book for curious minds of all ages {published by Annick Press}.
Written by Kira Vermond, illustrated by Suharu Ogawa and scientifically verified by staff at the Ontario Science Centre, Why Don’t Cars Run on Apple Juice? serves up the answers to 50 quizzical queries – from biology to geology to astronomy.
Why Don’t Cars Run on Apple Juice? is for anyone who loves to ask, “Why?” Get your hardcover copy at the Science Centre at The Gorilla Store or at any bookstore or online here for $19.95.

Kira Vermond is a Guelph-based freelance writer and children’s nonfiction author who has penned over 1,500 articles and columns for the Globe and Mail, The Nationl Post, Chatelaine, MoneySense, CBC, Owl, and others. Kira’s Why We Live Where We Livewon the prestigious 2015 Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children’s Nonfiction.

Kira is also the author of Growing Up, Inside and Out and The Secret Life of Money: A kids’ guide to cash and Half-truths and Brazen Lies: An Honest Look at Lying. She's currently working on a new books with Owlkids to be released this year.  
Many Quick Brown Fox readers will know Kira as a guest speaker at my Kid Lit weekly classes and Saturday Writing for Children and for Young Adults workshops. ~Brian
Visit her website here.

For information about submitting to Annick Press and to 20 other Canadian and American publishers who do not require you to be agented, see here.

For information about my next Writing for Children and for Young Adults workshop, see here.


See my full schedule here, including Saturday writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Alliston, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Georgetown, Georgina, Guelph, Hamilton, Jackson’s Point, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, New Tecumseth, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor,  Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Wednesday, September 11, 2019

Introductory Creative Writing course, Sept 26 – Nov 28, in Oakville


Welcome to Creative Writing
9 weeks of discovering your creative side
Thursday evenings, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
September 26 – November 28, 2019 (No class Oct 31)
Oakville Central Library, in the auditorium, 120 Navy St,  Oakville, Ontario (Map here)

Other Creative Writing courses – Personal Stories, Next Step and Intensive – are also offered this fall. See the details here.

This is your chance to take up writing in a warm, supportive environment. This course will open the door to writing short stories and writing dialogue, writing in first person and writing in third person, writing just for fun and writing all kinds of things. 
You’ll get a shot of inspiration every week and an assignment to keep you going till the next class. Best of all, this class will provide a zero-pressure, totally safe setting, where your words will grow and flower.
Fee:  $176.11 plus 13% hst = $199
To reserve your spot, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

Instructor Brian Henry has been a book editor and creative writing instructor for more than 25 years. He publishes Quick Brown Fox, Canada's most popular blog for writers, teaches creative writing at Ryerson University and has led workshops everywhere from Boston to Buffalo and from Sarnia to Saint John. But his proudest boast is that he’s has helped many of his students get published. 
Read a review of Brian's various courses and workshops here (and scroll down).

See Brian’s complete current schedule hereincluding writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Cambridge, Georgetown, Georgina, Guelph, Hamilton, Jackson’s Point, Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Saint John, NB, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Tuesday, September 10, 2019

"A Real Dickens of a Gift" by Laura J. Sagar



He knew exactly what to get me. My son bought me a t-shirt. But not just any t-shirt - this one had the text of one of my classic novels on it. Not only the text but also the images of the title character and the author are cleverly etched into the text.
     The book was one of my favourite stories when I was eight and still one of my favourite all time books. I’ve read it, seen it on film, seen it live, and auditioned for a part in the musical. I didn’t get the part but I did work backstage.
     My son even resembled the lead character when he was a young boy, as the character has been portrayed. They were both adorable and endearing with a flash of shy smile and innocent blue eyes, they could melt the heart of any motherly figure.
     It is a novel of abandonment and rescue, neglect and kindness, hypocrisy and sincerity. A simple tale really, with a fairy tale ending, but as a child it drew me into its world. If you haven’t already guessed, Oliver Twist is the book, by the incomparable Charles Dickens. Dickens’ ability to weave a tale was unlike any other. His stories have stood the test of time to become great classics.        
     No one could put a name to a character like Dickens could, characters such as Mr Bumble in Oliver Twist or Sir Dedlock of Bleak House and of course the infamous Ebenezer Scrooge of The Christmas Carol. Dickens evoked such descriptive characters from his observation of real life.
     He could draw emotion from deep within readers’ hearts and create images so raw that they stayed with the reader long after reading; indeed, they are not forgotten.  I felt a compassion for Oliver and a wariness for the Fagins of the world. I will admit a smitten admiration for the little rogue, Artful Dodger; a sense of kinship with the motherly figure of Nancy; and contempt for those who sowed injustice.
     His novels were a commentary on the social issues of the times but in many ways his words are timeless. His writings and phrases are woven into our culture, our sayings and our traditions. Who doesn’t recall, “Please sir, I want some more”? What a legacy to have such an influence on generations of readers.
     Dickens was a great writer but a human man. Raised in harsh Victorian times, he understood only too well the sorrows of society’s unfortunate citizens. He was as flawed as any other and caused his share of pain to those he loved. His treatment of his wife and mother of his many children, while carrying on an illicit affair with his mistress, conflicted with his image of champion of morality and justice.
     But history generally looks kindly on those whose contributions to art, history and culture are so magnificent. He could create such characters; both noble and contemptible, pompous and pitiful, humble and imposing. Characters who have inspired newer updated versions for modern times. Likewise, his tales are enduring. They continue to make their mark on new generations. They maintain relevant commentary on society and inspire new versions of time-honoured themes.
     This was the chosen gift from my son. I was delighted not just with the gift but that it was so thoughtful. Well done, my son. A small example of the ordinary achievement of raising a son in a loving home. Charles Dickens would have understood the significance of that.

Laura J. Sagar spent many years in a career of business writing and communication. Now she writes for pleasure. Fiction, poems and short essays are her current endeavours. She enjoys life in Mississauga with her family and adores time at the lake in Prince Edward County.


See Brian Henry’s schedule hereincluding writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Alliston, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Georgetown, Georgina, Guelph, Hamilton, Jackson’s Point, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, New Tecumseth, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.


Monday, September 9, 2019

Algonquin Park Writing Retreat at Arowhon Pines Resort, Friday, June 5 – Monday, June 8,




Algonquin Park Writing Retreat
Friday, June 5 – Monday, June 8, 2020
Arowhon Pines Resort, Arowhon Pines Rd, Little Joe Lake, Algonquin Park, Ontario, Canada


Give yourself a long weekend of writing time  a weekend of instruction, inspiration and creativity. Award yourself with time away from distractions, with no dishes to do and wonderful food at every meal, as you sit with your feet up and write in the most beautiful wilderness setting in Ontario. This is where the Group of Seven got its inspiration (Tom Thompson is buried just a couple of lakes over); it’s a wonderful place for you to find your inspiration, too.
The retreat will feature both instruction and guided writing exercises, plus one-on-one critiquing and coaching from Brian.  You’ll also have lots of time to relax, rejuvenate, and reconnect with your creativity. 
All writing levels welcome. Whether you are just beginning or have a novel in progress, please join us. 
The setting: Arowhon Pines is a peaceful, quiet resort nestled in the woods on Little Joe Lake inside Algonquin Park. There are no motorboats on the lake, except for the resort’s own pontoon boat which takes guests on occasional wildlife tours.
The resort is without TV and is far from the roar of traffic. The cry of a loon is the loudest noise you’re likely to hear all day.
Rates include charming accommodation (cabins have a mix of queen beds for one person or couples or twin beds for two people rooming together; rooms also have private bathrooms and each cabin has a lounge with fireplace to share with your fellow writers). 
Three all-you-can-eat gourmet meals per day are provided, featuring an abundance of fresh food prepared by master chefs and an inspired kitchen staff. (Bring your own wine or beer!)
All activities included. When you’re not writing, or for spouses who accompany you, there is plenty to do: canoe or kayak a series of lakes or hike trails to see wildlife (moose, loons, beaver, turtles, fox, deer), swim in the lake, sail, stand up paddleboard, play tennis, relax. For indoor activities there is a games room with table tennis, shuffleboard, books, board games. Your stay also includes access to all Algonquin Park programs and activities including a car pass for you to fully enjoy the park.

Check-in isn’t until 3 p.m., but guests can arrive in the morning to fully take advantage of the facilities (though the meals included in your package don’t begin until after check-in time, so lunch on Friday is extra if you arrive early). Each guest can borrow a day pass for Algonquin Park. The formal retreat will begin late Friday afternoon. On Monday, we'll have our last formal get-together at 11 a.m., ending at 12 noon. Check out time is at 1 p.m.  Most guests have lunch while the bellhops load the car. But once you’ve had lunch, don’t feel you have to rush off!
Participants are welcome to bring spouses, partners or friends, as there will be plenty to do while you’re writing – canoeing, kayaking or sailing, swimming if warm enough, tennis, reading and just plain resting and unwinding, enjoying the wilderness.

Read about a stay at Arowhon Pines 
here.

Instructor Brian Henry has been a book editor and creative writing instructor for more than 25 years. He publishes Quick Brown Fox, Canada’s most popular blog for writers, teaches creative writing at Ryerson University and has led workshops everywhere from Boston to Buffalo and from Sarnia to Saint John. But his proudest boast is that he has helped many of his students get their first book published and launch their careers as authors.
Read reviews of previous writing retreats at Arowhon Pines here (and scroll down). 
To see more reviews of Brian’s weekly courses and Saturday workshops, see 
here

Seminar fee:
For the full 4-day, 3-night retreat: $185.84 plus hst = $210

Book early – space is limited! Full receipts issued.
For more information or to register, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

Accommodation fee (including accommodation and food, plus use of all the resort’s facilities):
$268 per person, based on double occupancy ($536 per couple)
Or
$335 per night, based on single occupancy
Plus 15% service charge (in lieu of tipping), then plus 13% hst.

Book early – space is limited! Full receipts issued.

For more information or to register, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

Who can attend the retreat?
Everyone interested in developing their writing skills is welcome to attend, whether you're aspiring writer or an accomplished author or simply enjoy writing as a hobby. There is no requirement for you to have been previously published or even to have an intention to publish.

I'm a poet / playwright / other writer. Is this retreat for me?
The retreat is open to anyone who enjoys writing. Instruction will focus on narrative writing; i.e., stories, whether fiction or memoir. But if you’re an essayist or poet or whatever, you’re entirely welcome. 


Should I bring my work in progress?
Yes, if you have an on-going writing project, bring it with you! If you’re not currently working on anything, don’t worry, we’ll get you writing.

Should I bring my laptop?
Yes, if you prefer to work on your laptop. If you prefer to work on paper bring that. Or go crazy and bring both.

Can you cater to specific dietary requirements?
Yes, just let the staff at Arowhon Pines know beforehand about your needs.

I want to stay longer or arrive early. Is it possible to do that?
If you want to arrive early and stay longer, that is fine. Just arrange it with the resort. There is plenty to see and do in the park, and Arowhon Pines is a lovely place to base from.  Arowhon will keep the same rate throughout your stay.

Is there cell phone reception and WIFI?
Arowhon Pines is an island of luxury, but in the midst of wilderness, so no cell phone reception and no WIFI, though there are landlines and there’s access to the resort’s Internet connection. (Contact the resort for details.) But be sure to have your writing projects on your laptop when you come, not stored in the Cloud.

How about alcohol?
Arowhon doesn’t serve alcohol, but guests are welcome to bring their own wine, beer or whatever to have with meals or back at your cabin or wherever. (Though do note that Hemingway’s advice to write drunk, mostly produces drivel.)

Can I bring my spouse (or partner or friend)?
Certainly. Just let them know you’ll be spending most of your time writing, (though you will have some free time every day), and make sure they enjoy superb food, beautiful wilderness, and relaxing on the deck or the dock or out on a canoe as they glide past a moose munching on water lilies….

For more information or to register, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca 
To book your accommodation at Arowhon Pines, phone toll free: 1-866-633-5661
Or you can book on-line here~ But be sure to also phone and tell them you're with the writing retreat!