Monday, April 19, 2021

Four agents at The Friedrich Agency all looking for new authors



The Friedrich Agency

19 West 21st Street
#201
New York, NY 10010

http://www.friedrichagency.com/

Note: Don't ever miss a post on Quick Brown Fox. Fill in your email in the Follow Brian by Email box to the right under my bio, and get each post delivered to your Inbox. If you’re not yet on my newsletter list, send me an email, including your locale to:  brianhenry@sympatico.ca ~Brian

Molly Friedrich founded The Friedrich Agency in 2006, following nearly three decades at The Aaron Priest Literary Agency. She was joined by her daughter, Lucy Carson, in 2008. The agency has now grown to four agents, all of whom are looking for new authors.

Here’s what The Friedrich Agency says about itself: “The agency has retained its intimacy and dedication to attentive, hands-on representation. Our vision and strategy are built for the long term, nurturing and brokering not only print publishing rights, but every dimension of a writing career: translation rights, film & television, audio, serial, and merchandising. The Friedrich Agency is a proud home for a select and beloved list of novelists and authors of non-fiction, both critically and commercially celebrated.

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Hannah Brattesani was recently promoted to full agent. She’s the newest member of the team. After handling international rights for Emma Sweeney agency and Folio Literary Management, she joined the Friedrich Agency at the end of 2019. She represents literary  fiction and highly readable nonfiction.

“I’m always intrigued by literary fiction that has a playful disregard for the rules of a novel, like SPEEDBOAT by Renata Adler,” she says, “and I admire authors with a dark bent (Iain Reid) and an offbeat sense of humor (Jen Beagin).

"I’m drawn to narrative nonfiction that invites me into a community, culture, or lifestyle that I would never otherwise experience or reframes familiar subjects in humorous or surprising ways. I enjoy popular science but digest it in much the same way as I ate vegetables as a child: mixed into something I find more palatable – I need a strong story and voice to carry me through but appreciate every nutritious morsel I get along the way.”

Hannah tweets here; her handle is @hbrattessan

Query Hannah at: hbrattesani@friedrichagency.com

Include the word QUERY and title of your project in the subject line. No attachments. Full submission guidelines here.

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Heather Carr was at Trident Media Group for two and half years before joining The Friedrich Agency in March 2018. She’s seeking literary and commercial fiction and nonfiction.

“I’m drawn to voice-driven nonfiction that teaches me something new while never losing personal warmth and/or zaniness,” says Heather. “There’s a specific kind of alchemy that happens for me when a nonfiction writer marries their command of a subject with personal vulnerability. I’m also interested in long-form journalism of any type, but especially as it relates to gender and sexuality.

“In fiction, I love literary novels about dysfunctional families and friendships, high-concept commercial fiction, and anything with a singular voice.”

Query Heather at:  hcarr@friedrichagency.com

Include the word QUERY and title of your project in the subject line. No attachments. Full submission guidelines here.

Lucy Carson is a self-professed pop culture junkie who majored in Film. She handles the agency’s Film & TV rights as well as her list of literary clients. She seeks high-concept fiction and nonfiction.

“I’m always hungry for high-concept fiction told in a sophisticated style,” says Lucy, “and it all comes down to tension and emotional involvement.

“On the nonfiction side, I’m drawn to hybrids that might not fall into a strict category but do combine strong voice with important research (such as the work of our own Lesley Blume and Florence Williams).

“If you’re on Twitter, you’ll often see me tweet about whatever I’m reading for pleasure. I do this not only to spread the word about great books, but also to send a kind of wish into the universe for my own submission desires.”

Query Lucy at: lcarson@friedrichagency.com

Include the word QUERY and title of your project in the subject line. No attachments. Full submission guidelines here.

Molly Friedrich as a long list of accomplished authors, but like great agents everywhere, she can’t resist the call of really promising new author.

“My greatest four -a.m. fear as an agent is that I might have turned away Ulysses,” says Molly, “but I’d never have missed A Passage to India. Forty years ago, I’d have leapt to sell anything that wasn’t nailed down; over the years I’ve become more selective. Once starving, I’m now rarely hungry. That said, I’m still looking for the debut novel that is irresistible, for the nonfiction proposal which alters the way I see the world. I’m a fairly catholic, straight-ahead reader; I don’t flourish without well-rounded, declarative sentences!

Query Molly at: mfriedrich@friedrichagency.com

Include the word QUERY and title of your project in the subject line. No attachments. Full submission guidelines here.

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Literary agent Meg Wheeler

If you’re interested in meeting an agent and in getting published, don’t miss our online How to get Published workshop Saturday, May 8, with literary agent Meg Wheeler of Westwood Creative Artists (see here).

If you’re especially interested in writing for children, don’t miss Writing Kid Lit and Young Adult Fiction course, offered online Wednesday evenings, April 21 – June 16 (see here). 

We’re also offering Writing for Children and for Young Adults workshops online, on Saturday, April 24 with Orca Books editor Liz Kemp (see here) and on Sunday, July 11, with literary agent Maria Vicente of P.S. Literary (details to come, but you can reserve your spot now by emailing brianhenry@sympatico.ca).

Beyond that, Brian Henry’s schedule continues to take shape...

Online: Beginning Right – How to open your novel, Saturday, May 15. Details here.

Online: Finding Your Voice, Sunday, May 30. Details here.

Writing retreat:

Algonquin Park: Writing Retreat at Arowhon Pines Resort, an island of luxury in the middle of a wilderness. Friday, June 11 – Monday, June 14.  Details here.

Summer classes ~ in person:

In-person: Exploring Creative Writing, Wednesday afternoons, July 7 – Aug 25, in Burlington. Details here.

In-person: Intensive Creative Writing, Wednesday afternoons, July 7 – Aug 25, in Burlington. Details here.  

Information about online summer courses to come.

For more details or to register for any workshop, retreat or weekly class, email brianhenry@sympatico.ca

See Brian’s complete current schedule here,  including online and in-person writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Alliston, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Georgetown, Georgina, Guelph, Hamilton, Jackson’s Point, Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Southampton, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

 Navigation tips: Always check out the Labels underneath a post; they’ll lead you to various distinct collections of postings. If you're searching for interviews with literary agents or a literary agent who represents a particular type of book, check out this post.

Sunday, April 18, 2021

Finding Your Voice workshop, Sunday, May 30 ~ online

Finding Your Voice

Sunday, May 30, 2021
1:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Online and accessible wherever there’s Internet

If you do any kind of creative writing, fiction or nonfiction, this workshop is for you. What do publishers and agents all look for? Voice. We’ll tackle the nitty-gritty of creating a voice that’s all you while avoiding common errors that the drain life from your prose.

You’ll see how to put words on paper in a way that will grip the reader’s imagination, and you'll discover how to make your writing more vivid, more elegant and more powerful.

Workshop leader Brian Henry has been a book editor and creative writing instructor for more than 25 years. He publishes Quick Brown Fox, Canada’s most popular blog for writers, teaches creative writing at Ryerson University and has led workshops everywhere from Boston to Buffalo and from Sarnia to Saint John. But his proudest boast is that he has helped many of his students get published. 

Read reviews of Brian's workshops, classes, and writing retreats here (and scroll down).

Fee: $37.17 + hst = $42 paid in advance 

This workshop will be offered on Zoom. Orientation provided, but you will need a computer, tablet or smartphone with a mic and, preferably, a camera {i.e. a webcam}. 

To reserve a spot now, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

See Brian’s complete current schedule hereincluding online and in-person writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Alliston, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Georgetown, Georgina, Guelph, Hamilton, Jackson’s Point, Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Southampton, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

 

Saturday, April 17, 2021

On Being Welsh by Roger Moore


To be Welsh on Sunday

To be Welsh on Sunday in a dry area of Wales
is to wish, for the only time in your life,
that you were English and civilized,
and that you had a car or a bike and could drive or pedal
to your heart's desire, the county next door, wet on Sundays,
where the pubs never shut  and the bar is a paradise
of elbows in your ribs and the dark liquids flow,
not warm, not cold, just right, and family and friends
are there beside you  shoulder to shoulder,
with the old ones sitting  indoors by the fire in winter
or outdoors in summer,  at a picnic table under the trees
or beneath an umbrella that says Seven Up and Pepsi
(though nobody drinks them) and the umbrella is a sunshade
on an evening like this when the sun is still high
and the children tumble on the grass playing
soccer and cricket and it's "Watch your beer, Da!"
as the gymnasts vault over the family dog till it hides
beneath the table and snores and twitches until
"Time,  Gentlemen, please!" and the nightmare is upon us
as the old school bell, ship's bell, rings out its brass warning
and people leave the Travellers' Rest, the Ffynnon Wen,
The Woodville, The Antelope, The Butcher's, The White Rose,
The Con Club, the Plough and Harrow, The Flora, The Pant Mawr,
The Cow and Snuffers – God bless them all, I knew them in my prime. 


Sheep

Wales is whales (with an aitch) to my daughter
 who has only been there once on holiday,
very young, to see her grandparents,
a grim old man and a wrinkled woman.

They wrapped her in a shawl and hugged her until
she cried herself to sleep suffocating
in a straitjacket of warm Welsh wool.

So how do I explain the sheep?  They are
everywhere, I say, on lawns and in gardens.
I once knew a man whose prize tulips
were eaten by a sheep, a single sheep
who sneaked into the garden on market day
when he left the gate ajar. They get everywhere,
I say, everywhere. Why, I remember riding in
a passenger train and seeing five sheep travelling
on a coal truck leering, like tourists travelling
God knows where and bleating fiercely
as they went by.

In Wales, I say, sheep are magic.
When you travel to London on the train,
just before you leave Wales at Severn Tunnel Junction,
you must lean out of the carriage window and say
"Good morning, Mister Sheep!" And if he looks up,
your every wish will be granted.

And look at that poster on the wall: a hillside
of white on green, and every sheep as still as a stone,
and each white stone a roche moutonnée.

 

Swansea

To be Welsh in Swansea is to know
each stop on the Mumbles Railway:
Singleton, Blackpill, the Mayals, West Cross,
Oystermouth, the Mumbles Pier.

It's to remember that the single lines turn double
by Green's ice-cream stall, down by the Recreation Ground,
where the trams fall silent, like dinosaurs, and wait,
without grunting, for one to pass the other.

It's to read the family names on the War Memorial on the Prom.
It's to visit Frank Brangwyn in the Patti Pavilion
and the Brangwyn Hall. It's to talk to the old men
playing bowls in Victoria Park.

It's to know that starfish stretch
like a mysterious constellation, at low tide,
when the fishnets glow with gold and silver,
and the banana boats bob in the bay,
waiting to enter harbor, and the young boys dive from
the sewer pipes without worrying about pollution.  

But when the tide turns, the Mumbles Railway has been sold
to a Texan, the brown and yellow busses no longer run
to Pyle Corner, Bishopston, Pennard, Rhossili, sweet names
of tide and time, where I see my father fishing still
for salmon bass, casting his lines at the waves
as they walk wet footprints up the beach
to break down the sand-castle walls I built
to last forever on the Swansea sands.

 

In the cave
(Brandy Cove, Gower)

No: I do not understand these things.
I have had few visions.
No bush has actually burned for me.  

Though I have sat in this cave for many a day
I have heard no thunder, no earthquake,
and no thin, small voice has called my name.

I have only heard the wind and the waves
and the sigh of the seabirds endlessly flying.

Who set the curlew's cry between my lips?
Who dashed the salt taste from my tongue?

I will never forget the wet sand foaming
between my toes nor the cracked rock
crumbling under my hand... yet I never fell,
nor was I trapped by the sea below.

 ***

Roger Moore is an award-winning poet and short-story writer. Born in the same town as Dylan Thomas, he emigrated from Wales to Canada in 1966. An award-winning author, CBC short story finalist (1987 and 2010), WFNB Bailey award (poetry, 1989 & 1993), WFNB Richards award (prose, 2020), he has published 5 books of prose and 25 books and chapbooks of poetry. 

These four pieces are all from his latest book: On Being Welsh in a land ruled by the English. Read more here. Available from Amazon here.

Over 150 of his poems and short stories have appeared in 30 Canadian magazines and literary reviews, including ArcArielThe Antigonish Reviewthe Fiddlehead, the Nashwaak Review, Poetry TorontoPoetry Canada Review, the Pottersfield Portfolio and The Wild East.  He and his beloved, Clare, live in Island View, New Brunswick, with their cat, Princess Squiffy, but they live on the far side of the hill from the St. John River, with the result that there is not an island in view from their windows in Island View. Visit Roger’s website here.

See Brian Henry’s schedule hereincluding online and in-person writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Alliston, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Georgetown, Georgina, Guelph, Hamilton, Jackson’s Point, Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Southampton, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Friday, April 16, 2021

Beginning Right – How to open your novel, an online workshop, Saturday, May 15

Beginning Right – How to open your novel

Saturday, May 15, 2021
1:00 – 4:30 p.m.
Online and accessible wherever there’s Internet

Every page of your novel is important, but if agents and editors aren’t immersed in your story by the end of the first page, they’re not going to read the rest. If a reader isn’t hooked by the end of the first paragraph, she puts your book back and picks another off the shelf. This workshop is dedicated to writing openings that will catch the interest of agents, editors, and readers alike, and get your novel off to the great beginning it deserves.

Special opportunity: Bring your own first couple of pages – the first 500 words or so. You don't need to prepare anything, but if you like, email me your piece prior to our workshop. We want to do some peer critiquing for everyone, and I will critique several pieces so everyone can see what works, what doesn’t and how to improve your piece. 

Workshop leader Brian Henry has been a book editor and creative writing instructor for more than 25 years. He publishes Quick Brown Fox, Canada’s most popular blog for writers, teaches creative writing at Ryerson University and has led workshops everywhere from Boston to Buffalo and from Sarnia to Saint John. But his proudest boast is that he has helped many of his students get published. 

Read reviews of Brian's workshops, classes, and writing retreats here (and scroll down).

Fee: $37.17 + hst = $42 paid in advance 

This workshop will be offered on Zoom. Orientation provided, but you will need a computer, tablet or smartphone with a mic and, preferably, a camera {i.e. a webcam}. 

To reserve a spot now, email: brianhenry@sympatico.ca

See Brian’s complete current schedule hereincluding online and in-person writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Alliston, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Georgetown, Georgina, Guelph, Hamilton, Jackson’s Point, Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Southampton, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.

Thursday, April 15, 2021

“Voice in my Head” by Lisa Reynolds


Voice in my Head - by Lisa Reynolds

(For Vicki)

Look in the mirror. Ignore pale skin and dark circles. Apply lipstick. Pucker. Smile.

At the therapist’s office, share that your best friend died.

If she asks, tell her I was forty-nine.

Mention a few tidbits.

How we met at work.

Took turns on breaks, microwaving popcorn in the staffroom; burning more than a few bags.

Remember how the smell lingered?

Drove everyone nuts.

Don’t forget to tell her how we used to hang out at that bar on Yonge Street – you know the one.

I’d drink Bordeaux while you sipped tomato juice, pretending it was a Cesar.

We’d laugh at the ridiculous, share horror stories about relationships, then laugh some more.

Tell her other stuff too.

Like when I was admitted into hospital, how I ditched my gown, and met you in the lounge

wearing jeans and a t-shirt.

We ignored the code blues, hogged comfy seats in a corner, and swapped secrets;

the box in my dresser drawer, the one you hid under your bed.

Before you leave her office, tell her you wore bright colors because I suggested you do.

On your way out, check your face in your compact mirror.

Reapply lipstick. Pucker. Smile.

*** 

Lisa Reynolds is a Canadian writer of poetry and short stories whose works are published internationally in anthologies, literary journals, and magazines. She lives in a waterfront community east of Toronto, Ontario. She is writing her first book of poems, reflections on living with chronic illness.

“Voice in My Head” was originally published in WordCity Monthly Literary Journal – Nov 2020 Issue3. See more of Lisa’s poetry in WordCity here.

For information on submitting to WordCity, see here.

See Brian’s complete current schedule here,  including online and in-person writing workshops, weekly writing classes, and weekend retreats in Algonquin Park, Alliston, Bolton, Barrie, Brampton, Burlington, Caledon, Collingwood, Georgetown, Georgina, Guelph, Hamilton, Jackson’s Point, Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Midland, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Southampton, Sudbury, Toronto, Windsor, Woodstock, Halton, Muskoka, Peel, Simcoe, York Region, the GTA, Ontario and beyond.